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Old 03-15-2015, 08:13 AM   #1
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Go easy on me, another sight question

Okay, I'm over the cost thing from previous post. But now it's a technique question and whether or not my thinking is straight.
So I am right handed, left eye dominant. I have a natural tendency to pull all my shots to the left. When I do take time to set up for shots, I have to "off center" the gun to bring it in line with my left eye.
So my question that may get me beat up is this: If I buy an adjustable rear sight, can I utilize that feature to make up for being right handed and left eye dominant? I would adjust the sight left to allow for a more natural positioning of shooting in front of my right eye. Does this make since or does it reveal my rookie status in the handgun world ?
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Old 03-15-2015, 08:35 AM   #2
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I'm not a trainer and there are plenty here who can shoot better than me. I'm left handed, right eye dominant, shoot long guns right handed, handguns left handed.

To answer your question, no, do not move your sights to compensate for any weakness. Pulling your shots to the left is not a natural tendency, it's an opportunity to improve your technique and skill.
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Old 03-15-2015, 09:28 AM   #3
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Come on RustyIron, I'm part of the generation that wants easy fixes and results now (better put, instant gratification). You speak of practicing technique and skills, not burning through the brass with nothing but 10 rings by "writing a check for it" !

Deep down and all kidding to the side, I know what you say is true. But I guess I was hoping that there may have been an oversight of something involving less time (but more money). To the range it is .
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Old 03-15-2015, 09:29 AM   #4
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That might appear to help the problem but would only work at one specific distance. I assume it's too late to learn to shoot with the other hand. For target shooting close your left eye.

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Old 03-15-2015, 09:44 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Shady Oaks View Post
Come on RustyIron, I'm part of the generation that wants easy fixes and results now.
Then might I suggest finding porn you like (you can avoid talking to girls altogether) and buying knives with replaceable blades.

Every other human endeavor--including wiping your own butt--requires practice amid endless failures.

My suggestion is to get a revolver, leave some of the cylinders empty and watch what happens when you shoot. One thing you'll find is that you have a terrible flinch. But as you slow down and "camp out on the front nock" you'll uncover all of the little seemingly unimportant twitches and idiosyncrasies you have leading to the let-off.

And learn to sharpen your own knife. Wet rocks are everywhere, guys like me are a dying breed...sheesh
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Old 03-15-2015, 10:59 AM   #6
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Are you positive that the sights are correctly adjusted? I bought an XD-45 last year that always shot low and left, no matter who was pulling the trigger. I bought a set of Truglo TFO sights for it and had a gunsmith install them. The gun no longer shoots left, and it's only a mite low, regardless of who is shooting it now. It came from the factory with the sights out of alignment. Have you had anybody else shoot the gun to see if it is really you, and not the gun?



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Old 03-15-2015, 02:59 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Insta-Gator View Post
That might appear to help the problem but would only work at one specific distance. I assume it's too late to learn to shoot with the other hand. For target shooting close your left eye.

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I won't say it's too late. Worth trying.

Originally Posted by The Tourist View Post
Then might I suggest finding porn you like (you can avoid talking to girls altogether) and buying knives with replaceable blades.

Every other human endeavor--including wiping your own butt--requires practice amid endless failures.

My suggestion is to get a revolver, leave some of the cylinders empty and watch what happens when you shoot. One thing you'll find is that you have a terrible flinch. But as you slow down and "camp out on the front nock" you'll uncover all of the little seemingly unimportant twitches and idiosyncrasies you have leading to the let-off.

And learn to sharpen your own knife. Wet rocks are everywhere, guys like me are a dying breed...sheesh
I know part of it is a bad flinch. I know when I use the programmed mode at the indoor range I did better, less time to think about things. I also recently read an article talking about accuracy (it happened to be talking about rifles, but this concept carries over to the handgun world). It said that we jerk, or flinch, due to recoil and the first stage of recoil is muzzle blast. It recommended wearing earplugs and earmuffs together to cut down on the effect of the muzzle blast. Going to give it a try.

And with my first decent knife coming as a gift next month, I'll take your advice on learning to sharpen a knife here soon.

Originally Posted by Richard View Post
Are you positive that the sights are correctly adjusted? I bought an XD-45 last year that always shot low and left, no matter who was pulling the trigger. I bought a set of Truglo TFO sights for it and had a gunsmith install them. The gun no longer shoots left, and it's only a mite low, regardless of who is shooting it now. It came from the factory with the sights out of alignment. Have you had anybody else shoot the gun to see if it is really you, and not the gun?
I'm pretty sure it's me. My brother shot with me that day and was more in line with center than myself. And as I mentioned above, I did good with center mass shots when I was running 1 and 2 second turns on a programmable lane. So with that in mind, it'd probably hurt even more to try adjustable sights if at some point and time I can be accurate with it as is.
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Old 03-16-2015, 10:28 PM   #8
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Wink Helpful Hints!!

Okay, there are two things you can do to help eliminate your "pull to the left"!! First just a word to ease your frustration. I had a friend that I shot with for years who was cross indexed. He was left eye dominant and shot right handed. He was one of the best shots I have ever known. And I have known some good ones over a 40+ year career of competition and recreational shooting.

For the cross indexed issue, you have the choice of learning to shoot using your right eye (yes, it can be trained) or just position your firearm so as to use you dominant eye for sighting. Try both and see which feels more comfortable or you can shoot better with. Another choice is to try shooting with your weak side hand. From shooting various matches that required weak hand shooting, I learned that I could actually shoot much better left handed than I could right handed. I just wasn't as fast.

Now, done to business. Of the two things that you can do to help eliminate your flinch/pull, one costs nothing but time and the other will cost you some money. The cheap method is dry firing!! Lots of dry firing! You will learn trigger and muzzle control from these exercises!! Needless to say, visually and physically (with your pinkie) verify that your pistol is unloaded FIRST. Leave ALL ammunition in another room!! My favorite form of this exercise was to do it while watching an action movie on TV. Dry fire shooting the bad guys in the movie is great fun and great practice!!!

I have gone deeply into describing the next exercise on other threads, so I'm just going to give the basics here.
  • Temporarily mount a 12" X 12" X 1/4" piece of plywood to your garage or basement wall (double face tape works fine).
  • Tape a standard sheet of typing paper to the plywood.
  • Use a pencil to mark a 1/8" diameter dot in the center of the page.
  • Take your 1911 pistol (previously verified as unloaded) drop the pencil down the barrel and cock the hammer.
  • With the muzzle 1/2" away from the paper, sight in on the dot, concentrating on sight alignment, slowly squeeze the trigger.
  • Repeat this "shooting exercise" about 10 or 12 times. Each time concentrating on sight alignment and trigger control.
  • Now lower your pistol and take notice of your results! The pencil will leave a dot on the paper each time you shoot, creating an actual "grouping"!!
  • As you continue, strive to create a smaller and smaller "mini grouping"!!
  • It's just like range shooting; except without the muzzle flash, recoil, noise or costly of ammo.
  • Repeat as often as possible. You WILL become a MUCH better shot!!

The second item that will improve your shooting, but will cost you some money is a good professional trigger job. Make sure you tell the 'smith whether this work is for self defense carry or just target work. That will determine how light he makes the pull. The trigger job takes the longer, rough, creepy and heavy trigger pull out of the equation. You are left with a light crisp pull that does not draw your shot away from the point of aim as you pull the trigger. If you have a good trigger on your 1911, you can skip this costly step and just resort to the dry firing and pencil shooting!

There ya go. Practice, practice, practice. Let us know how it works out for you. Good luck and good shooting. Be Safe!!!
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Last edited by Lineman; 03-16-2015 at 10:30 PM.
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Old 03-17-2015, 07:19 AM   #9
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Thanks lineman, I'll be give this a try very soon. I've done some dry fire practice with a penny on the front sight to help eliminate flinching, but like the sounds of the exercises you described.
As for the trigger, I'll have to find someone who knows more than me. I once heard a saying that works for most things in life: "The best you've ridden is the best you know." Now this was regarding motorcycle suspension work, but replace ridden with anything and it holds true. Yes, I think my trigger pull is good out of the box, but I've never pulled a trigger with work on it.
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Old 03-17-2015, 10:49 AM   #10
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Wink A Word From The King of Snooty Trigger Fingers!!

Okay, I can educate you on good triggers, too!!! Here is the check list:
  • Is there a lot of take up in the trigger before it actually starts to activate the trigger mechanism?
  • Once engaged with the actual pull, do you have to consciously feel you are straining to PULL the trigger?
  • Is there a rough/gritty feeling to the pull or is it smooth?
  • Once the hammer has fallen, does the trigger still continue movement to the rear?
If your answer is yes to any or all of these conditions and your pistol has been "broken in", your trigger needs work! How much work is dependent on your shooting experience and the intended purpose of the firearm. If you are a relative novice shoot or are going to employ the firearm as self defense gun, you do not want to go too light. If it is to be a range gun only, well then, lighter is better. Going below 4 lbs. can be a bit scary, so I would not go less than that for a range gun. About 5-6 lbs is good for an all around or pure self defense pistol.

There you have it!!!

Signed, King Snoot I, master of the match grade trigger!!!
Ed Brown Snakeskin MSH4.JPG
This bad boy's hammer drops at a hair over 4 lbs!!!
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Last edited by Lineman; 03-17-2015 at 10:54 AM.
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