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Old 05-21-2020, 01:32 PM   #21
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As of yesterday, I now have a cartridge failure (dud) story with a big boar bear as a main character. First, you may need to know that I live on top of a mountain surrounded by 1.2 million acres of national forest land and a federal river reserve. Needless to say their are lots of critters in those mountains. In my unfenced back yard, I have seen herds of deer, large flocks of turkeys, coyotes, two cougars, five wolves, several bobcats, razorbacks, numerous Bald Eagles and in warm weather all sizes of Black Bear. Only two types of animals give me any real problems: razorbacks and bears. The razorbacks root, destroy property and sometimes really try to hurt people. Bears (Black Bears) are just hungry, perpetual eating machines. They dig up the nests of ground hornets and Yellow Jackets. Bear will eat anything that any other animal will eat. They run like a deer, swim like a fish, and climb like a squirrel. This story is about a big rawboned boar bear that discovered that garbage cans often contain good food.
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Old 05-21-2020, 01:35 PM   #22
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Sorry, apparently I accidentally bumped something. The rest of the story shortly.
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Old 05-21-2020, 01:54 PM   #23
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After living in a remote logging camp in the north end of Vancouver Island for years, I think I can guess where this one is going. We had the same critter count as you there, and it could get quite "interesting" at times.
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Old 05-21-2020, 06:20 PM   #24
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The house is one property from the mountain, and we often have visitors, mostly deer, but also, black bear. I had trimmed the maple tree away from the house, and the wires, so I have a small pile of kindling, and tinder for the neighbors to take, as they want. About 0200 to 0300 hrs, I get three big deer, who eat the young, tender maple leaves. Sometimes they are here during the daylight hours.
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Old 05-21-2020, 06:24 PM   #25
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Rick, you're right. No amount of shouting, banging on metal, firing scare shots, from 12 gauge could stop him from dragging my trash can down the mountain. My trash can wasn't worth the hungry bear's life.
But, I didn't want the bear to take my can.

Then, I remembered that the last time the State Bear Manager was tagging a bear in my back yard he had given me three nonlethal 12 gauge rubber/plastic slugs for stubborn hungry bears. He told me to be at least 50 yards from the bear, wait until the bear's head was facing away from me and shoot him in the hind quarters.

I hurriedly got a shell, walked down the mountain a ways, got within range, waited for the shot, took aim with my old single shot slug gun, squeezed the trigger . . . and a soft click was heard -- a dud. I quickly cocked again and this time I pulled the trigger -- same result. My, now that bear appeared to be the size of an elephant. He seemed to give me an angry look.

Memories raced through my mind that four years earlier I had a yearling bear make a faux charge at me while I was standing tall and shouting as loud as I could. Remembering that, and the fact that I didn't have a change of underwear, I was greatly relieved when he returned his interest to the trash can. I was further delighted that I don't live in grizzly county. Shaken, I walked home leaving the trash can with the bear.

Looking back over the incident, the bear, even though he seemed to look directly at me, given that bears have extremely poor vision, he may not have even seen me at all.

There are too many morals of the story to list.
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Old 05-21-2020, 06:41 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by motormac View Post
The house is one property from the mountain, and we often have visitors, mostly deer, but also, black bear. I had trimmed the maple tree away from the house, and the wires, so I have a small pile of kindling, and tinder for the neighbors to take, as they want. About 0200 to 0300 hrs, I get three big deer, who eat the young, tender maple leaves. Sometimes they are here during the daylight hours.
Beautiful animals!

I have previously put out corn for them in the winter. Now, the State prohibits feeding deer due to wasting disease. However, deer in my area love milkweed. Fortunately, it grows prolifically on the mountain. Deer do little damage to the shrubs and flowers -- plus they clean up my acorns.
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Old 05-21-2020, 06:50 PM   #27
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These deer wipe out flower petals, and gardens, so we don't plant gardens. I have some sweet onion seeds drying, so I may try them, after we stop having frost.
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Old 05-21-2020, 08:43 PM   #28
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I drove through Valley Forge Park, to and from work in King of Prussia, and especially, at night or twilight, one had to be wary of the hundreds of deer standing on the road, or on the shoulder. The deer would eat the acorns for weeks at a time. The park had seven times the number of deer that could be supported by the amount of land. The rich neighbors would complain that the deer were eating the flowers, and they wanted the deer removed. Then, the people would tell the rangers, that they didn't want the deer killed, but they just wanted the deer moved to another area. When I traveled through this area at 0200, or 0300 hrs, there would be hundreds of deer standing on the roadway, and both sides of the road. I had to sit and wait, and slowly, creep past the deer, as they would not move out of my path. Finally, the rangers brought in archers, and thinned the herd, donating the meat to the prisons, and other kitchens. There are still two times the number of deer on the land, that it will support. The down-staters do not understand that when I flash my lights, it means that there are deer on the road, and turn on their high beams to show me, that they do not realize that I am warning of caution on the roadway. They, also, tailgate while driving through the area, and blow their horn, when I brake, so that I do not collide with the deer. When a deer is on the shoulder at the edge of the road, I turn on my flashers, but they do not understand that, too.
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