Cartridge failure stories. - Kimber Forum

Kimber


Go Back   Kimber Forum > Kimber Model Specific > Kimber Rifles Forum

Like Tree54Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-12-2020, 09:35 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Boston Mountains
Posts: 28
Cartridge failure stories.

My two youngest grandkids are in their second year of shooting. In their safety training, I told them about the four types of cartridge failures and my personal experience with them.

I have experienced duds in all calibers, two cartridge separations in old reloads of high-power ammo, one squib load in a 38 revolver, and no hang fires or delayed detonations at any time with any caliber.

Currently, I have the grandkids wait about thirty seconds after a misfire before they eject the unfired cartridge. Any real life stories of cartridge failures would make safety training much more effective. Do any of you have any stories that I could share with kids about cartridge failures? ... the more detailed the better. WARNING: The grandkids will read your posts before we talk about the stories.

Thanks,
Roger
motormac likes this.
Rogeroge is offline   Reply With Quote
Remove Ads
Old 05-12-2020, 12:10 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Rick in Oregon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: High Desert of Central Oregon
Posts: 1,395
I can report only one cartridge failure, and it was with a .22LR in a Ruger 10-22.

On an extended rat shoot about five years ago, one of my buddies was riding in the bed of his dad's pickup, shooting sage rats and jackwabbits over the roof as we cruised the perimeter of alfalfa fields on the ranch with his 10-22 rifle, at the request of the rancher.

We heard a sort of muffled report, then "Oowwww!" It appeared one round had not completely chambered properly, or fired late as the bolt was opening, but the burnt powder really scorched his 'holding hand'. It was WW HP ammo, and we've never had an issue such as that since, thankfully.

He intended to contact Winchester, but after coming back home, he didn't consider it worth the effort.

A fun Rimfire morning....fun for us, not so much if you happen to be a jackwabbit: (the buzzards and worms gotta eat too" - Josie Wales)



Moral: A clean rifle is a safe rifle.

(Full disclosure: We had been shooting our .22's straight for four days, at least 500 rounds a day. I'm thinking the dirty chamber from so much shooting contributed to the issue, not really the fault of the ammunition. But that's just a theory.)
2sharp2, wayne, Wingnut and 2 others like this.
__________________
Semper Fortis
USN Amphibious/RVN 1966
NRA Life, VVA

Last edited by Rick in Oregon; 05-12-2020 at 12:13 PM.
Rick in Oregon is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2020, 12:45 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Cucamonga kid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Big Sky Country-The Last Best Place
Posts: 4,497
The only incident I can recall in recent memory was not a cartridge failure, but I had grabbed a bunch of loose ammo from the bottom of my range bag and proceeded to load my 9 mm to do a little plinking in the woods and when I fired I heard a very light report. Immediately I thought of a squib load so I cycled the slide and checked the casing and found that it was a 380 round instead of a 9 mm round. The next thing I did was check the barrel and there was no obstruction in it. The 380 fired but did not cycle the next round.
Even with hearing protection I could tell that it was a lighter report and also a light recoil and immediately knew that something was different.
wayne, Wingnut, motormac and 1 others like this.
__________________
Buy American - MAGA!
Cucamonga kid is online now   Reply With Quote
 
Old 05-12-2020, 01:47 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Boston Mountains
Posts: 28
Originally Posted by Rick in Oregon View Post
I can report only one cartridge failure, and it was with a .22LR in a Ruger 10-22.

On an extended rat shoot about five years ago, one of my buddies was riding in the bed of his dad's pickup, shooting sage rats and jackwabbits over the roof as we cruised the perimeter of alfalfa fields on the ranch with his 10-22 rifle, at the request of the rancher.

We heard a sort of muffled report, then "Oowwww!" It appeared one round had not completely chambered properly, or fired late as the bolt was opening, but the burnt powder really scorched his 'holding hand'. It was WW HP ammo, and we've never had an issue such as that since, thankfully.

He intended to contact Winchester, but after coming back home, he didn't consider it worth the effort.

A fun Rimfire morning....fun for us, not so much if you happen to be a jackwabbit: (the buzzards and worms gotta eat too" - Josie Wales)



Moral: A clean rifle is a safe rifle.

(Full disclosure: We had been shooting our .22's straight for four days, at least 500 rounds a day. I'm thinking the dirty chamber from so much shooting contributed to the issue, not really the fault of the ammunition. But that's just a theory.)
After reading your post the kids told me, "That's way better than your stories" And, they were even more impressed with the rabbits. My left handed grandson asked if you son was using a LH semi. Was he? Thanks, Roger
motormac likes this.

Last edited by Rogeroge; 05-12-2020 at 01:59 PM.
Rogeroge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2020, 02:39 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Boston Mountains
Posts: 28
Originally Posted by Cucamonga kid View Post
The only incident I can recall in recent memory was not a cartridge failure, but I had grabbed a bunch of loose ammo from the bottom of my range bag and proceeded to load my 9 mm to do a little plinking in the woods and when I fired I heard a very light report. Immediately I thought of a squib load so I cycled the slide and checked the casing and found that it was a 380 round instead of a 9 mm round. The next thing I did was check the barrel and there was no obstruction in it. The 380 fired but did not cycle the next round.
Even with hearing protection I could tell that it was a lighter report and also a light recoil and immediately knew that something was different.
Thanks, one moral is: If you suspect that you have heard a very light-load report, at least check the barrel for an obstruction.

My only squib was in my friend's 38 revolver with his reloads. On the squib shot the report sounded weak. Tried to swing the cylinder out only to discover that the bullet had not completely cleared the cylinder and was lodged in both the barrel and the chamber. If the bullet would have traveled another half inch, the results could have been catastrophic. That was the last time to use my friends reloads. Thanks again.
motormac likes this.
Rogeroge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2020, 02:45 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Rick in Oregon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: High Desert of Central Oregon
Posts: 1,395
Originally Posted by Rogeroge View Post
After reading your post the kids told me, "That's way better than your stories" And, they were even more impressed with the rabbits. My left handed grandson asked if you son was using a LH semi. Was he? Thanks, Roger
Roger, glad to hear your young-uns liked the story. That was a good morning for sure except for Dan's burnt hand. We used to walk the sage flats not far from town 20 or so years ago with our .22's and think nothing of shooting 60 apiece of so before lunch. Sure makes a guy good on running shots!

Dan, my young buddy in the pic above is shooting a straight/pistol-grip laminated Ruger stock from a 10-22T model rifle. Good for RH or LH shooting. I'm holding my Clark Custom 10-22 (all Clark internals, Douglas Premium bbl w/match chamber) in a Boyd's thumbhole walnut laminated stock. She's a real shooter.

Dan is also the 'wild one' in my crew; you never know what he'll show up with for bunnies, rock chucks or sage rats. Here's an example:



We were spending the morning shooting sage rats for the rancher, and Dan spies a rock chuck in the rimrock at just over 800 yards away. So he scurries off to his truck rifle stash, and emerges with his .338 Lapua Magnum. Note his silly little grin.

If you've never seen a western rock chuck, here's one near my place:



We just never know what Dan will come up with next. Great long range fun with a rifle though!
2sharp2, wayne, Wingnut and 3 others like this.
__________________
Semper Fortis
USN Amphibious/RVN 1966
NRA Life, VVA
Rick in Oregon is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2020, 04:31 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 141
About for years ago, after almost 30 years of reloading, I had my first, and so far, only squib load in a revolver. I waited 30 seconds with the gun pointed down range, then checked the gun. The cylinder would not turn, and the cylinder wouldn't open, the bullet was half in the barrel, and half in the chamber.

At home I used a brass rod to drive it back into the chamber. All was well. That night, I ordered a lock out die for the reloading press.
motormac and Rogeroge like this.
Holster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2020, 04:34 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
2sharp2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Chattanooga
Posts: 12,290
My Story

My story is not as good as Rick's and I don't have any pics. Rick, gosh those are some really big bunnies, they look to be almost as big as Kracker.

Also mine is more of a memory problem and not a cartridge failure. Anyway back in the 1990's I was bass fishing (2-3 sometimes more times) a lot. I always had a "boat pistol" it stayed on the boat, a Smith & Wesson stainless M629 .44magnum with 6" barrel loaded with CCI ShotShells for snakes (Copperheads mostly) I also had three speed loaders with full house magnum hollow points for 2-legged snakes that you run into at the boat ramp.

In a unpopulated section of the Tennessee river on a big flat rock was a big copperhead, I grab the .44 (thinking it is loaded with shotshells) I take my best Dirty Harry one handed stance, cock the hammer, squeeze the trigger...KABOOM! I was peppered with rock, bits of snake, smoke, yep I had touched off a Full House magnum load on the copperhead, I killed the snake and the big rock he was on. Checked pistol, Hmmm 5 magnum hollow points one empty case. Forgot had put magnums in a few days before going to the boat ramp late the other night.

Moral to the story: Check your ammo BEFORE you need to shoot.
Holster, wayne, Wingnut and 2 others like this.
__________________
The Kimber Family

CDP & RCP Ultra's
Classic Carry Pro (Factory Bone Grips)
Custom Two-Tone 45/.460Rowland
Gold Combat Limited Edition
Master Carry Pro
Sapphire Ultra 9mm
SIS Custom, Pro, Ultra
Stainless Ultra Carry 9mm
Stainless Raptor Custom, Pro, Ultra
Super Carry Ultra Plus
TLE Pro (TFS)

84M Longmaster Classic SS .308
SVT 22lr Stainless Fluted Bull Barrel
Kimber Of America 82 Stainless Fluted .22lr
84M Varmint Stainless 204 Ruger
2sharp2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2020, 04:41 PM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Boston Mountains
Posts: 28
Originally Posted by Holster View Post
About for years ago, after almost 30 years of reloading, I had my first, and so far, only squib load in a revolver. I waited 30 seconds with the gun pointed down range, then checked the gun. The cylinder would not turn, and the cylinder wouldn't open, the bullet was half in the barrel, and half in the chamber.

At home I used a brass rod to drive it back into the chamber. All was well. That night, I ordered a lock out die for the reloading press.
Exactly my experience. I used a wooden dowel to drive my lodged bullet into the chamber. Thanks for sharing. Roger
Holster and motormac like this.
Rogeroge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2020, 05:29 PM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Boston Mountains
Posts: 28
Originally Posted by 2sharp2 View Post
My story is not as good as Rick's and I don't have any pics. Rick, gosh those are some really big bunnies, they look to be almost as big as Kracker.

Also mine is more of a memory problem and not a cartridge failure. Anyway back in the 1990's I was bass fishing (2-3 sometimes more times) a lot. I always had a "boat pistol" it stayed on the boat, a Smith & Wesson stainless M629 .44magnum with 6" barrel loaded with CCI ShotShells for snakes (Copperheads mostly) I also had three speed loaders with full house magnum hollow points for 2-legged snakes that you run into at the boat ramp.

In a unpopulated section of the Tennessee river on a big flat rock was a big copperhead, I grab the .44 (thinking it is loaded with shotshells) I take my best Dirty Harry one handed stance, cock the hammer, squeeze the trigger...KABOOM! I was peppered with rock, bits of snake, smoke, yep I had touched off a Full House magnum load on the copperhead, I killed the snake and the big rock he was on. Checked pistol, Hmmm 5 magnum hollow points one empty case. Forgot had put magnums in a few days before going to the boat ramp late the other night.

Moral to the story: Check your ammo BEFORE you need to shoot.
2Sharp2, you are indeed quite a storyteller. Lesson learned...and you got the Copperhead. Roger
2sharp2 and motormac like this.
Rogeroge is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On