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Old 10-30-2017, 09:46 PM   #1
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Got a Gip?

Came across this info in an email and thought I'd share it here. Came to me free and unrestricted, so why not? Peruse and ponder--then maybe even try it out and report in. Know that's an almost excessive expectation, but I have faith in you folks.


So, what is the Gip?

The “Gip” on my Glock is a scratch, imperfection, or mark on the front sight that is approximately the size of the head of a pin-- approximately the same size as the macula in the eye. The macula is the area of the eye with the highest concentration of cones). The Gip is smaller than a tritium or fiber optic vial.

The word “Gip” doesn’t mean anything or stand for anything…on purpose. The inventors made up the term so that it would have no pre-conceived emotions attached to the name.

Deep, clear focus on the Gip does a few things that shooters are going to be interested in…

Focusing on the Gip gets more of your brain involved in the shooting process. Focusing on the Gip guarantees that you’re focusing on the front sight. Most shooters look at their target, converge their eyes to center the front sight in the rear notch and on the target, and then converge focus on the front sight. This focus movement of the eye is called a “saccade” movement of the eye. In reality, most people are looking THROUGH the front sight instead of having a fine focus on the front sight because they aren’t focusing on anything specific on the front sight.

Focusing on the Gip is a “pursuit” movement of the eye that insures that you are truly engaging the parts of the eye/brain that need to be engaged to make sighted shots with extreme precision. This pursuit movement of the eye engages a completely different set of nerves and different (additional) parts of the eye and brain than the saccade movement.

Put another way, shooting only with saccade movement of the eye is like a professional football team choosing to play with only 7 players. When you include the pursuit movement, you’ve got the whole team playing.

It’s a little complicated to grasp at first, but rest assured that the concept has very little to do with whether you understand the biology involved and everything to do with recruiting as much of your brain as possible to take part in the shooting process.

It’s definitely possible, but much harder to shoot precisely when your front sight is wider than your target. By putting a small white Gip on my front sight I’m able to essentially have a front sight that is narrower than my target, making it MUCH easier to hit the target.

Aim small, miss small. This concept is well known, but the Gip is key to it. If you pick the 2nd button down on a shirt instead of shooting center-mass, it’s much easier to center the front sight on that button if you have a Gip that is narrower than the button.

Focusing on the Gip improves shot placement on moving targets. When you have a hard focus on the Gip, your eyes will naturally (and unconsciously) center the front sight in the rear notch and center the front sight on your target. The unconscious mind not only sees more frames per second than the conscious mind, it also processes hundreds of thousands of times more computations per second. If you focus your conscious mind on the Gip, your unconscious mind can drive the mechanical process of aiming the gun and releasing the shot.

It’s incredibly easy to put a Gip on your gun. You need either white-out, an appliance paint pen, or “sight paint” (sold at gun stores). Take a toothpick, wet the end of it (you don’t want a whole drop) with your chosen marking fluid and touch it to the top-center of your front sight, right above your tritium vial or front sight dot (if you’ve got one) until you’ve got a spot that’s about the size of the head of a pin.

In a pinch, you can use a technique that I used at the range yesterday…simply take a piece of tape and cut a 1/16” wide piece and stick it on your front sight. It probably won’t stay on for more than a day, but in a pinch, you can use it to verify the effectiveness of the Gip before doing anything more permanent.



So let me know what you think and (I really hope) how well it works!
RustyIron and Old Timer 57 like this.
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Last edited by kretch50; 10-30-2017 at 09:53 PM.
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Old 10-30-2017, 10:54 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by kretch50 View Post
Came across this info in an email and thought I'd share it here. Came to me free and unrestricted, so why not? Peruse and ponder--then maybe even try it out and report in. Know that's an almost excessive expectation, but I have faith in you folks.


So, what is the Gip?

The “Gip” on my Glock is a scratch, imperfection, or mark on the front sight that is approximately the size of the head of a pin-- approximately the same size as the macula in the eye. The macula is the area of the eye with the highest concentration of cones). The Gip is smaller than a tritium or fiber optic vial.

The word “Gip” doesn’t mean anything or stand for anything…on purpose. The inventors made up the term so that it would have no pre-conceived emotions attached to the name.

Deep, clear focus on the Gip does a few things that shooters are going to be interested in…

Focusing on the Gip gets more of your brain involved in the shooting process. Focusing on the Gip guarantees that you’re focusing on the front sight. Most shooters look at their target, converge their eyes to center the front sight in the rear notch and on the target, and then converge focus on the front sight. This focus movement of the eye is called a “saccade” movement of the eye. In reality, most people are looking THROUGH the front sight instead of having a fine focus on the front sight because they aren’t focusing on anything specific on the front sight.

Focusing on the Gip is a “pursuit” movement of the eye that insures that you are truly engaging the parts of the eye/brain that need to be engaged to make sighted shots with extreme precision. This pursuit movement of the eye engages a completely different set of nerves and different (additional) parts of the eye and brain than the saccade movement.

Put another way, shooting only with saccade movement of the eye is like a professional football team choosing to play with only 7 players. When you include the pursuit movement, you’ve got the whole team playing.

It’s a little complicated to grasp at first, but rest assured that the concept has very little to do with whether you understand the biology involved and everything to do with recruiting as much of your brain as possible to take part in the shooting process.

It’s definitely possible, but much harder to shoot precisely when your front sight is wider than your target. By putting a small white Gip on my front sight I’m able to essentially have a front sight that is narrower than my target, making it MUCH easier to hit the target.

Aim small, miss small. This concept is well known, but the Gip is key to it. If you pick the 2nd button down on a shirt instead of shooting center-mass, it’s much easier to center the front sight on that button if you have a Gip that is narrower than the button.

Focusing on the Gip improves shot placement on moving targets. When you have a hard focus on the Gip, your eyes will naturally (and unconsciously) center the front sight in the rear notch and center the front sight on your target. The unconscious mind not only sees more frames per second than the conscious mind, it also processes hundreds of thousands of times more computations per second. If you focus your conscious mind on the Gip, your unconscious mind can drive the mechanical process of aiming the gun and releasing the shot.

It’s incredibly easy to put a Gip on your gun. You need either white-out, an appliance paint pen, or “sight paint” (sold at gun stores). Take a toothpick, wet the end of it (you don’t want a whole drop) with your chosen marking fluid and touch it to the top-center of your front sight, right above your tritium vial or front sight dot (if you’ve got one) until you’ve got a spot that’s about the size of the head of a pin.

In a pinch, you can use a technique that I used at the range yesterday…simply take a piece of tape and cut a 1/16” wide piece and stick it on your front sight. It probably won’t stay on for more than a day, but in a pinch, you can use it to verify the effectiveness of the Gip before doing anything more permanent.



So let me know what you think and (I really hope) how well it works!
I find this concept interesting. I'll have to think it about it more. You're right, it does take an open mind to accept something like this. I am going to try it out. Thanks for the tip kretch50!
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