Scissors and The Edge Pro - Kimber Forum

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Old 12-17-2017, 08:18 AM   #1
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Scissors and The Edge Pro

As I stated, today my DIY project is to bring a pair of scissors back from the dead. No question, they are the cheapest, most easily damaged implements to be mistakenly shipped out of Beijing to the USA and marketed as "cutting tools."

They also happen to belong to my wife's favorite salesperson. So when "Lisa" asks, I soak the stones.

First. some word about the fixture. Because the main structure of the Edge Pro base can be adjusted at any angle, I use it as a small vice. The best polisher in the world, Dwade Hawley, used this same device to sharpen auger bits for the Canadian government's ice drills.

I use it like a "third hand."

As you can see, the first blade is inked and ready for the initial cut.

001.JPG
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Old 12-17-2017, 08:35 AM   #2
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As with any cutting tool, the first thing is to true up the bevel. I used a worn out 140 Atoma since this Chinese metal is about 6 Rc points away from Turkish Taffy.

My initial stone cuts will be made with older Edge Pro stones (a 320 and a 600 grit), which are somewhere over ten years old.

This is the repair portion, and I made sure I had a giant burr on the obverse side. There were three large chips in the first 1.5 inches of the tip.

Once the scratch pattern is removed, I'll switch over to Ken's stones to make sure the edge is uniform and sharp.

BTW, look at the obverse side of the tine sticking straight up. Look at all the chips and rolls.

002.JPG
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Old 12-17-2017, 09:57 AM   #3
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...this steel is softer than a candy bar...

That swarf came from a 600 grit Edge Pro stone. It might sound funny, but polishing might take one stone and one paper.

003.JPG
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Old 12-17-2017, 10:41 AM   #4
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I have to admit, there are a few things I can do quite well, putting a sharp edge on anything is my downfall. I couldn't sharpen a butter knife to slice through butter. Care to start a thread to help us who are sharpening challanged get better results? What do we need to get started, what are the steps would, be a great start for me other than throwing it away and buying new...
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Old 12-17-2017, 02:26 PM   #5
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You bring up a point I think Chuck and I should discuss. Lots of guys want to learn and don't know what to buy, but they are all at differing levels of involvement.

But we should have a forum tutorial, and Chuck does want this section of the forum to be more DIY.
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Old 12-17-2017, 03:39 PM   #6
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Yes, this was my reason for starting the "Knives" sub forum. I think the tutorial should be very basic, treat the process like you would if you were teaching a person who has never been near a gun before how to safely shoot.
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Old 12-18-2017, 05:38 AM   #7
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There are numerous ways to sharpen--freehand, using a guided system or using a stone or glass held in a fixture, like the HandAmerican idea. All have advantages.

Parts of Japanese knives must be done freehand. A damaged, chipped or poorly sharpened knife benefits from a guided system.

You and I need to confab.
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Old 12-18-2017, 06:04 AM   #8
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Do you do anything to the flat side? In my experience, the flat side of "scissors-style" tools actually develops a bit of a curve after extended use.
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Old 12-18-2017, 06:18 AM   #9
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What would be a inexpensive guide system for the beginner to try and see if he or she has what it takes. Thanks I'm following your posts and they sure are interesting and offer great knowledge.
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Old 12-18-2017, 06:54 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by RustyIron View Post
Do you do anything to the flat side? In my experience, the flat side of "scissors-style" tools actually develops a bit of a curve after extended use.
There are two ways to do it, one seems primitive, but it works.

For example, some guys can get a knife sharp, but they have trouble removing the last of the burr. One sharpener keeps a little box of scrap leather, and makes a slice through it.

On the tine of a scissors, the entire obverse side is dings and chips and remnants of a burr. Some guys just open and close the scissors several times. Others take five or six sheets of newsprint and cut it several times.

Personally, I use a paper/glass for the Edge Pro. The tines of a scissors are like the obverse side of a Japanese yanagiba. That is, concave. I rest the glass so it is touching both edges, start at the pivot and make a uniform stroke off the tip.

If the damage has been extreme, I'll use a 5000 grit Nubatama and make the same stroke. You can finish with the paper/glass.
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