New Knife Polishing Tool - Kimber Forum

Kimber


Go Back   Kimber Forum > Off Topic Area > Knives

Like Tree12Likes
  • 2 Post By RustyIron
  • 2 Post By The Tourist
  • 1 Post By swca
  • 2 Post By RustyIron
  • 3 Post By The Tourist
  • 1 Post By Mike240
  • 1 Post By The Tourist
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-22-2018, 06:47 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
RustyIron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: La Habra, California
Posts: 2,679
New Knife Polishing Tool

Maybe this isn't really needed, but it's a new toy. And it's seven bucks. That should be enough for you to scroll down immediately and click on the link to buy one.

My regular magnifiers aren't powerful enough. And my powerful magnifier is older than Galileo and virtually unusable. It seemed that I could do better work if I could actually SEE the edges I was polishing. So I bought the magnifier linked below.

The package showed up today. The magnifier is smaller than I thought, and it doesn't focus well at the outer edges of the viewable area. But it's still quite usable. I whipped out the knife I usually carry, which is some of my best work, and focused along the edge. Seeing the edge at 60x revealed that my best work looks like I went at it with a bench grinder!

Even so, it's still a nice edge. But next time I get out the stones, I'll be able to better see what I'm doing, and perhaps up my game a little.
And if not, it's still a fun toy. I've had at least seven bucks worth of fun looking at everything from a c-note to dog hair.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Chuck43 and swca like this.
__________________


Join the NRA
RustyIron is offline   Reply With Quote
Remove Ads
Old 02-23-2018, 02:18 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
The Tourist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 7,110
I think a lighted loupe or your lenses are needed to do better work. You made a good choice, and your work will improve.
Chuck43 and swca like this.
__________________
...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...
The Tourist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2018, 02:44 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
swca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Spring Valley,Ca.
Posts: 4,175
I carry a small magnifying glass in my pocket when I go to the swap meet and estate sales or yard sales it makes it easier to read the manufacturers stamp for model and where it was made on the knives and other collectables my eyes cannot read anymore.
Chuck43 likes this.
__________________
Tom

Where freedom dwells is my country!

CDP Pro II .45 acp
Raptor II (blue) .45 acp
Eclipse II 10 mm
Ultra Carry II .45 acp
Stainless Pro Carry II
Solo STS 9 mm
swca is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 03-23-2018, 10:37 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
RustyIron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: La Habra, California
Posts: 2,679
Tonight I broke out the stones to touch up the edge on my EDC. I started with an 800. When I thought it was "good enough," I broke out the loupe. To my surprise, there was one section with some waviness where I missed the edge in a couple spots. I did a do-over, and continued to visually check my work as it progressed. The resulting edge is quite satisfying.

One more question, if I'm allowed to hijack my own thread... Is it better to use a clean stone, or to let the mud accumulate? I can rationalize an argument for both.

Does anyone ever improve the wetness of water? A little bit of alcohol in water will improve it's wetness, as will a few drops of dish soap. Is there any benefit from this when working on knives?
Chuck43 and Jflytle like this.
__________________


Join the NRA
RustyIron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2018, 05:56 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
The Tourist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 7,110
Soft stones benefit from the "mud" it makes as the stone slowly grinds away as does the edge. It provides a muted finish.

I like hard stones. I've done this long enough to make the "soft" part my hand strength on the section to be polished.

I have a tall theater glass full of clean water and soak my stones (and clean them) constantly. I also have a pile of clean rags to remove dirt and swarf.

Always wipe down off the edge. You won't get scratches on the decorative part of the knife, and more to the 'point,' you won't cut yourself, either!
Chuck43, RustyIron and swca like this.
__________________
...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...
The Tourist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2018, 06:24 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Mike240's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,702
What is the proper way to clean Arkansas and India stones?
Jflytle likes this.
__________________
Yea. Keep telling yourself that split times donít matter.
Mike240 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2018, 06:39 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
The Tourist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 7,110
Originally Posted by Mike240 View Post
What is the proper way to clean Arkansas and India stones?
Honestly, I do not know. I believe those are oil stones, and I have never used them.
__________________
...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...
The Tourist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2018, 06:24 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Jflytle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Northern ILL
Posts: 3,492
Originally Posted by Mike240 View Post
What is the proper way to clean Arkansas and India stones?
Mike, you can use white vinegar on the surface, Iíve also soaked the face with some kind of shop solvent.
Jflytle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2018, 01:33 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
RustyIron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: La Habra, California
Posts: 2,679
Originally Posted by Mike240 View Post
What is the proper way to clean Arkansas and India stones?
I've never been accused of being proper, nor am I and expert on the subject. But I have an extensive accumulation of stones, chunks of stones, and even chips of stones that I use in my garage/machine shop.

After buying a pile of good rocks from Ken Swartz, I thought it prudent to figure out how to care for them. I bagged a Norstrand flattening stone from Amazon. The claim is that it's good for both oilstones and waterstones alike. I think it works great for keeping my "good" stones flat. I've also used it on some of my oily, filthy, mucked up stones from the garage. It works very nicely and now even the junky ones are a joy to use.
__________________


Join the NRA
RustyIron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2018, 05:29 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
The Tourist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 7,110
After a job is done, I soak the stones I've used and get most of the dirt out. Then I take a pencil and make three large "X" marks in the middle of the stone.

I have a large 140 Atoma I got from Ken, and I use that to make asymmetrical passes on the stones until the X shapes are gone. Then I turn the stones to 45 degrees and gently break the edges on the Atoma.

I keep all my stones clean and flat.
Chuck43 likes this.
__________________
...No matter where you are it's enemy territory...
The Tourist is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The dirty side of polishing. The Tourist Knives 0 02-10-2018 09:53 AM
Show Us Your Knife!!! Lineman Knives 85 09-04-2017 10:55 AM
Knife stories.... ChattanoogaPhil Knives 5 08-07-2017 06:55 AM
Knife Gets Approval The Tourist Knives 14 02-07-2017 08:07 PM
New knife in 3V alloy coming this week. The Tourist Knives 0 01-08-2017 04:46 AM