The dreaded "pie cut" chip. - Kimber Forum

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Old 04-12-2019, 07:13 AM   #1
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The dreaded "pie cut" chip.

Not only does a polisher refine edges and make bevels look attractive, but we also have stones for repairs.

The worst repair is a "pie cut" chip. Let me explain.

Most folders get little dings in them as a matter of course. However, when you see a deep, triangular wedge taken out of a bevel you know the knife has taken a hit, perhaps dropped on concrete.

Yes, the final strokes will blend your repair to the rest of the edge, but as for a severe chip, you must get it all out, every bit.

Like glass, hardened alloys will just keep causing issues with the original damaged area. And when you remove the chip, you have to take a little more of the area as there might be the start of an unseen crack.

Once that is completed, the next step is to blend the bevel into the repair. Below is Bigdog's Benchmade, and it had a bad chip I found with a single stroke of a stone. It's not fatal, but you have to take some extra care in removing the pie-cut.

Click on the picture to enlarge.

DSC02573.JPG
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Old 04-12-2019, 10:30 AM   #2
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Just finished Bigdog's knives. They turned out quite toasty.

But I am sending them to Rob for a touch up...LOL

Click on pictures to enlarge:

DSC02575.JPG

DSC02574.JPG
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Old 04-12-2019, 12:34 PM   #3
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Chico -- Amazing work, and I thank you. Will be listening for the rumble of the UPS truck next week!
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Old 04-12-2019, 12:50 PM   #4
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Bigdog, you should have heard all of the Sicilian epithets that slid out of my mouth as I chased whisker marks!

Oh, there's a reason. Lots of guys will stick a knife into a sweaty summer pocket and leave it there for weeks. If I leave a scratch or a whisker mark I might be creating a place for future pits.

You said you were going to use it, including defense. While I go over all knives with a huge lighted loupe, I make sure that all "working knives" get a rigorous examination.
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:44 PM   #5
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You're about 100x better with folding knives! 99.5% of all my work is one kitchen knives so that's what I'm most comfortable with. I'll use stones on some of my larger bushcraft/woods blades but a lot of times I'll do a belt sharpening on stuff I'm just gonna use to baton wood.

Of course, my Spyderco knives will get the stones...
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:54 PM   #6
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Wow, brilliant work!
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Old 04-13-2019, 06:08 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
You're about 100x better with folding knives! 99.5% of all my work is one kitchen knives so that's what I'm most comfortable with.
I'm sure all polishers find their niche' and their preferences.

Having said that, there are times when I have to polish my Hattori and I wish you were there!

One of the benefits of sharpening pocketknives is that you work steady and often. In fact, I am far behind on some Barges, which I sneak into the mix as I work on time sensitive projects. That, and a minor hernia surgery slowed me up, since I stand when I polish.

If you look at my pile of "Schwartz rocks" I'm sure you could find a couple of tools (in numerous grit levels and widths) to polish a paring knife! I didn't even include my 3x9 Shaptons--wherever they are...

Click on the picture to enlarge.

DSC02549.JPG
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Old 04-19-2019, 12:11 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by The Tourist View Post
Just finished Bigdog's knives. They turned out quite toasty.

But I am sending them to Rob for a touch up...LOL

Click on pictures to enlarge:

Attachment 112118

Attachment 112120
Look at these edges Chico sent back to me and tell me the man is going to stay retired?!?

Artists don’t retire...they just work less hard!
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Old 04-19-2019, 04:40 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
You're about 100x better with folding knives! 99.5% of all my work is one kitchen knives so that's what I'm most comfortable with.
After Chico convinced us that any one of us can take our rusty old pocket knife and put an edge on it suitable for performing an emergency appendectomy, I've been playing and experimenting. I started off with a Chinese clone Edge Pro, then moved to Ken Schwartz's stones, and now I'm waiting for the genuine Edge Pro to arrive in the mail next week.

My German kitchen knives are now sharper than anyone's that I've ever met... except maybe my brother-in-law, because I've been working on his consumer-grade Japanese knives. And those knives intrigue me.

Suppose I threw down for fancy Japanese chef's knife. No, not the four-figure jobs that I'd be afraid ever remove from the saya. Something in the low three figures is fancy enough for me. So if I came home with some folded steel Japanese knife, would the Edge Pro be a suitable tool for maintaining the edge?
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Old 04-19-2019, 04:51 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
99.5% of all my work is one kitchen knives so that's what I'm most comfortable with
Rob, while I try to point out the nuances of polishing, I've never showed the edges or the blade blanks of Japanese folded steel. I did say that on any given stone pass, you were cutting into both hard steel and softer alloys.

I admire your work and the time you called me back at zero-dark-thirty one night to help me fix a gyuto with a chip dead center on the edge.

I do hold my breath when I do that Hattori, fortunately it only requires a light touch-up once per year...

I've talked to Dwade. I wish I had your touch.
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