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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy,

TLE II .45 ACP. Only 200 rnds through it so far. Brand new and I'm a "new" shooter returning to the sport after along break.

Curious: What is done to change the trigger pull? The weight and or feel?

Mine feels a little gritty as well.

Neither quite to point of taking in to a smithy but curious as to how much time to give it. As much as the gun may settle in so will I.

I understand he grittiness can work itself out but not the weight of the pull.

Any proven techniques or time frames i should give it before making changes?

As with ANY subject on-line I am getting baffled.

Thanks,

Hayduke
 

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In my opinion you should wait until after the recommended break in period before you start considering any adjustments.Once the gun is broken in then sit back and evaluate what needs to be done,if anything.Best wishes on the outcome.:)
 

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Your trigger should be set at between 4 - 5lbs from the factory. I wouldn't recommend you trying to adjust it, if it's really feeling gritty give Kimber customer service a call.

Customer Service
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If it's something you can live with for a while I'd just continue to shoot it and see if it works it's self out. If you have access to a trigger pull gauge you can try measuring it and if it's out of spec. again call customer service.
 

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Howdy,

TLE II .45 ACP. Only 200 rnds through it so far. Brand new and I'm a "new" shooter returning to the sport after along break.

Curious: What is done to change the trigger pull? The weight and or feel?

Mine feels a little gritty as well.

Neither quite to point of taking in to a smithy but curious as to how much time to give it. As much as the gun may settle in so will I.

I understand he grittiness can work itself out but not the weight of the pull.

Any proven techniques or time frames i should give it before making changes?

As with ANY subject on-line I am getting baffled.

Thanks,

Hayduke
You've been given great advice so far. As Chuck said, Kimbers triggers are set between 4-5 pounds trigger pull. You don't want it any lighter unless you are a top ranked competition shooter. Springs polishing and such is what changes that. I don't understand gritty. Being a new shooter, is that a term you've just heard, or can you describe it? My best advice is to shoot as many rounds down range as you can afford and you and your Kimber will both improve beyond your expectations!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You've been given great advice so far. As Chuck said, Kimbers triggers are set between 4-5 pounds trigger pull. You don't want it any lighter unless you are a top ranked competition shooter. Springs polishing and such is what changes that. I don't understand gritty. Being a new shooter, is that a term you've just heard, or can you describe it? My best advice is to shoot as many rounds down range as you can afford and you and your Kimber will both improve beyond your expectations!
OK,

Gritty is off a bit. Hard to describe what it is. More of a primary rub before I get to where the actual pull is. Like the squared off back of the trigger stirrup (sorry I bet that's the wrong term…I'm still learning) is not lubed.

What happens is I squeeze the trigger and ~1 out of 10 times it is a two step event with the above described scenario. If I pause after this and then proceed the trigger is lighter and smoother.

It's more of a feeling. I also notice the hammer strike sounds quieter if when I get the 2 step I pause then squeeze. I can hear nothing "inside" as if some tension is being released and pretty sure it's an on/off affair not degrees.

I'm having the feeling something is just dry inside, in fact dry is closer than gritty. If gritty, like 600 grit, just not glassy smooth.

Thanks,

Hayduke
 

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OK,

Gritty is off a bit. Hard to describe what it is. More of a primary rub before I get to where the actual pull is. Like the squared off back of the trigger stirrup (sorry I bet that's the wrong term…I'm still learning) is not lubed.

What happens is I squeeze the trigger and ~1 out of 10 times it is a two step event with the above described scenario. If I pause after this and then proceed the trigger is lighter and smoother.

It's more of a feeling. I also notice the hammer strike sounds quieter if when I get the 2 step I pause then squeeze. I can hear nothing "inside" as if some tension is being released and pretty sure it's an on/off affair not degrees.

I'm having the feeling something is just dry inside, in fact dry is closer than gritty. If gritty, like 600 grit, just not glassy smooth.

Thanks,

Hayduke
Totally different then gritty. Clean and lube your gun per the manual that came with your Kimber. Shoot it at least 500 rounds. Then report your findings.
 

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I'm going to suggest you call customer service and speak with one of Kimbers technicians. Your further description of the problem leads me to believe there is definitely something wrong. You should feel a little bit of smooth travel or take up and then be on the trigger which should break clean. I know it's hard to describe the way something feels on a computer, these guys are trained to analyze problems like this and will advise you on the best course of action to take. Kimbers customer service department is one of the best in the industry.
 

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Unless you know what you are doing take/send the pistol to a gunsmith and have the trigger setup to your needs.

If you try any home adjustments be sure to test the work by loading only one or two rounds in the magazine in case it goes full auto.
 

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Forget all that advice.


Box it up, take it to your local FFL shop and send it to the address I send you via PM.

That way you won't have to deal with that nasty trigger at all.


:D :D :D
 

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I agree with Chuck call Kimber, These guns are known for very good triggers and yours sounds wrong.
 

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First, this is a brand new gun with a factory warranty, (Kimber Mfg., Inc. firearms are warranted to be free from defects in material and workmanship for one (1) year after the date of original new gun retail purchase, the Manufacturer agrees to correct by repair or replacement (with the same or comparable quality model) your firearm, without charge, if returned prepaid with a copy of the bill of sale.) why should he pay a gunsmith to work on it? Second if someone else works on the gun Kimber may void his warranty. Again I am going to suggest he call customer service and speak with a technician. If the technician agrees that there is a problem with the gun they will cover the cost of fixing and shipping the gun to and from the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Totally different then gritty. Clean and lube your gun per the manual that came with your Kimber. Shoot it at least 500 rounds. Then report your findings.
Thanks,
But what lubrication points would address this?

More research suggests this may be trigger creep. I understand creep is a function of sear and hammer mating surfaces. BUT my issue is not consistant and it seem as though it should be if it's as above.

In no way a deal breaker! I can live with it as-is but the rest of the 1911 is so darn sweet and perfect, shoots incredibly straight and not one hiccup; it deserves a fine trigger.

So I will continue to shoot and see how it goes. Still unsure about getting lube down inside, would spraying Ballistol inside the frame be advised? Other products?

Kimber suggested I send it back to them but it's not that big of an issue and IME one of those repairs that the chances coming back the same or worse just as likely. 5 week wait nixes that option anyway.

if it continues to bug me I will have a gunsmithy address it with a trigger job. I'd rather pay $200 and have the hammer and sear "upgraded".

Ed Brown components seem to get high marks…

Please don't take this as a complaint! Just trying to learn more about the Kimber as I really like. If I didn't I'd send it off but I plan on shooting twice a week and not ready to give it up for a day!

Thanks,

Hayduke
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
First, this is a brand new gun with a factory warranty, (Kimber Mfg., Inc. firearms are warranted to be free from defects in material and workmanship for one (1) year after the date of original new gun retail purchase, the Manufacturer agrees to correct by repair or replacement (with the same or comparable quality model) your firearm, without charge, if returned prepaid with a copy of the bill of sale.) why should he pay a gunsmith to work on it? Second if someone else works on the gun Kimber may void his warranty. Again I am going to suggest he call customer service and speak with a technician. If the technician agrees that there is a problem with the gun they will cover the cost of fixing and shipping the gun to and from the factory.
Great advice…but..

Like I said I don't consider it a problem per se. I didn't notice it at first and it may very well be under Kimber's specs. Plus 5 weeks at Kimber so maybe 7 weeks…not cool for a new gun to have to be gone for 2 months…especially for a minor "problem".

Sure it could be a small burr or un polished surface rubbing but in that case any competent smithy should be able to solve it quickly.

While I'm not too concerned about the dreaded mim nonsense I'll replace all the small parts as they fail or are being addressed by a smithy with tool steel.

Found a local with 40 years experience who charges a very fair price. He does suggest Kimber components are great but tool steel an option. He charges the same to fit as he takes down the entire gun and polishes all moving surfaces, even the safeties.

But I'm just gonna shoot for now!

Thanks,

Hayduke
 

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Thanks,
But what lubrication points would address this?

More research suggests this may be trigger creep. I understand creep is a function of sear and hammer mating surfaces. BUT my issue is not consistant and it seem as though it should be if it's as above.

In no way a deal breaker! I can live with it as-is but the rest of the 1911 is so darn sweet and perfect, shoots incredibly straight and not one hiccup; it deserves a fine trigger.

So I will continue to shoot and see how it goes. Still unsure about getting lube down inside, would spraying Ballistol inside the frame be advised? Other products?

Kimber suggested I send it back to them but it's not that big of an issue and IME one of those repairs that the chances coming back the same or worse just as likely. 5 week wait nixes that option anyway.

if it continues to bug me I will have a gunsmithy address it with a trigger job. I'd rather pay $200 and have the hammer and sear "upgraded".

Ed Brown components seem to get high marks…

Please don't take this as a complaint! Just trying to learn more about the Kimber as I really like. If I didn't I'd send it off but I plan on shooting twice a week and not ready to give it up for a day!

Thanks,

Hayduke
Following your post about your problem, I'm not sure it is a lube issue. At any rate, always follow the lube instructions in your owners manual. Another thing you could do is let an experienced 1911 shooter try your Kimber and get a second opinion.
 
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