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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was looking at the various rounds available at FM. 230 gr ball, their 230 gr HP and the 230 gr XTP. (wish I actually had some in hand.)

From looking at the pictures, it seems the 230 gr HP (especially the XTP) is a more conical round.

How might this affect the ogive and free bore issue some are having? Could switching to a HP round provide some free bore and eliminate the the rifling/ogive contact problems?

If I had samples of these rounds I'd do the marker-turn test myself, but I don't. Any experience out there on this?
 

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I have a few hundred rounds of the FM XTP left and hope to get more. I've shot 100 through my Ultra Raptor and 50 through my Warrior SOC. Both guns love them!! No problems at all. I plan am using them for self defense rounds. I want to get more just to occasionally use at the range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mike must be working hard this week. I figured he would be the only one with the correct technical answer.
 

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If I understand correctly. My response is that the issue is the distance from the base of the cartridge case to the point where the ogive begins. This is the last location that the projectile is at its fullest or widest diameter. The length from thAt point forward and the shape from that point forward may have some effect of feeding and chambering but not returning to battery and locking up.

Ending the barrel fitting process with the GO and NO GO gauges and hoping the buyer uses ammo that does not cause a conflict is wrong. Or telling to change a spring at 800 rounds is silly. 800? Get real. Just because I also sell springs? There needs to be some leade cut into the chamber ahead of the shoulder where the case stops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If I understand your response correctly, the ogive location for a 230gr .45 cartridge should be the same distance from the rear of the cartridge to ogive, thus ensuring consistent chambering, regardless of the style of bullet. Style change, round nose, round nose flat point, hollow point, does not (or should not) change the position of the ogive.
 

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If I understand your response correctly, the ogive location for a 230gr .45 cartridge should be the same distance from the rear of the cartridge to ogive, thus ensuring consistent chambering, regardless of the style of bullet. Style change, round nose, round nose flat point, hollow point, does not (or should not) change the position of the ogive.
I can't say that it should I just know that it doesn't. It varies from maker to maker and bullet design. Think of making a 185 gr bullet have the same feed ability as a 230. There less mass to play with so dimensions are going to be altered.

Hand loaders all know that all 230 gr fmj bullets are not the same. Change bullet but load to the same length and you can have a ftrb issue because the ogive is in a different location on each bullet.

I have learned from those that know more than I that the right leade corrects this for all ammo I have tried and I have not noticed any change in practical accuracy. Could Brian Zinns? Probably.
 

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To add my 2c, if you look in reloading manuals, each bullet manufacturer has a recommended OAL for their particular bullet. If you load to these specifications, you will not (usually) have a problem chambering them in your gun. The caveat is, if you have a CUSTOM chamber! Be cautious if you try seating bullets to less than the recommended OAL too! It doesn't take much to increase the pressure generated to a dangerous level...especially if you're dancing around the max charge levels!
 
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