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Monty, I've had to do the same thing to my M9 and more. The edge of the firing pin hole was raised and sharp and quickly caused light strikes. It didn't take much to correct the problem and I have no doubt if I ever had to send the pistol in to Kimber for any reason they probably wouldn't even notice. I'm with you on not sending a gun in for something as simple as this, especially since I've seen less than stellar work from manufacturer's so called Gunsmiths. I also don't pay much attention to the forum police as most simply like to hear themselves squawk.
 

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I had a Kimber Solo fly apart in my hand during firing, was sent back to Kimber and returned fairly quickly only to find it totally unreliable with any and all ammo I could get me hands on so things can go awry in either case.
Not surprised that Kimber returned your Solo in less than satisfactory condition. There's been a few reports from folks saying Kimber gave up trying to fix thier Solos and instead issued a credit for another model.

As far as your Micro warranty.... Kimber has been known to perform warranty work on their guns outside of their stated warranty period and for second owners. Kimber generally has great CS but they do have quirks. If you dick with the gun (external or internal) then you either pay to have the gun returned to original condition or forfeit warranty service. It's just how they roll.
 

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Monty,

I had precisely the same problem with the same brass primer shavings causing jams in my new Micro Nine in the same way. This is a lawyer-induced problem. Kimber made the firing pin far too short, and with too heavy a firing pin return spring, so it would bounce back, and then they put far too heavy a hammer spring on it, to get enough force to "bounce" the short firing pin far enough forward to barely dent a primer deeply enough to fire it...sometimes, maybe. This in turn gave it a trigger pull of about 12 to14 pounds (I measured). With the firing pin bouncing back so quickly, still during the high pressure part of the firing cycle, some normal 9 mm service loads will extrude the primer into the firing pin hole, where it is shaved off as the barrel moves downward and unlocks too early, because the slide is too light for this small pistol design. There is not enough weight and spring force to make things work right. Stupid.

Everything is wrong about this Kimber design. It took me three months of redesigning, cutting, welding, manufacturing, and heat treating to fix all the problems I found. I will never again buy anything made by this "new" iteration of the formerly respected Kimber name.

I designed, manufactured, and heat treated a new firing pin of the correct full length, and out of drill steel, so it will stay in the slide's firing pin hole, to which it is closely fitted, until chamber pressure has subsided and the barrel is ready to be unlocked. The hammer is holding it there. This pin is not notched for Kimber's stupid trigger-actuated firing pin safety plunger, which I permanently removed. I also made, wound, and heat treated a slightly heavier custom slide spring, which will keep the gun locked until it is actually time for it to be unlocked. And I made a different, lighter firing pin return spring. Then I designed, wound, and heat treated a lighter hammer spring, which dents primers deeply, but gives a normal trigger pull of 3 - 4 pounds.

Result: No more shaved primers jamming a defensive pistol. Zero jams. And a normal, moderate trigger pull allows both accuracy and reliability.

The down side: None of this is "lawyer approved", and it would invalidate your warranty, which is worthless anyway, if the gun doesn't work, as it came from Kimber. And, this modified pistol must never be carried with the hammer down, on a live round, because bumping the hammer could fire the pistol. Carry with an empty chamber. I can chamber a round in half a second. I thus have 100% carry safety. So, I had to choose between a useless, unreliable, "lawyer approved" pistol which protects the manufacturer from almost all chance of lawsuit, or a reliable pistol that protects me from dangers of the real world, the reason for which one buys such a pistol in the first place. I made my choice.

It would take too long to describe all the other things I did, to change this beautiful-but-worthless pistol into something useful, over three months. It can be done, if you have the skills, machine equipment, and time to waste.

Yep, no more shaved primers, and no more brass shavings in the slide's firing pin channel, totally jamming up the mis-designed firing pin, while some bad guy is emptying his 100% reliable Glock into you. And the Glock is less expensive to buy.

Sorry, but I get all steamed up, thinking how much money I payed for this lovely, neat looking pistol, what a stinker it turned out to be, and the stubbornness I had to exercise to make it reasonably useful. But I can still never fully trust it, as I do my Glock 43. These are two entirely different animals. The Micro Nine is, sadly, a range toy, something nice to hold and look at.

And I don't need to read all the long-winded stories about Micro Nines that worked fine, right out of the box. I now know these pistols forward and backward, inside and out, and I know what the truth is. If some get out the door and work well, with one or two boxes of a certain type of ammo, lucky you. IT IS AN ACCIDENT. In my carry pistol, I want near certainty, not a roll of the dice.

This is not a condemnation of any other model of Kimber pistol. I have no experience with them. And Kimber may change the Micro Nine internal design at any time, for the better. I hope they do and, if so, I wish the company well. But this one...yech!
 

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And I don't need to read all the long-winded stories about Micro Nines that worked fine, right out of the box. I now know these pistols forward and backward, inside and out, and I know what the truth is. If some get out the door and work well, with one or two boxes of a certain type of ammo, lucky you. IT IS AN ACCIDENT.
I won't be long winded on this...but my Micro 9 Rapide has close to 500 rounds thru it and has NEVER had a problem. My wife's Micro 9 Two Tone has +200 rounds has yet to misfire. My daughter's Micro 9 Two Tone is at around 150 rounds down the pipe and no problems encountered. Is that THREE ACCIDENTS?
 

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And I don't need to read all the long-winded stories about Micro Nines that worked fine, right out of the box. I now know these pistols forward and backward, inside and out, and I know what the truth is. If some get out the door and work well, with one or two boxes of a certain type of ammo, lucky you. IT IS AN ACCIDENT. In my carry pistol, I want near certainty, not a roll of the dice.

This is not a condemnation of any other model of Kimber pistol. I have no experience with them. And Kimber may change the Micro Nine internal design at any time, for the better. I hope they do and, if so, I wish the company well. But this one...yech!
[/QUOTE]

Couldn't agree more... I still carry mine from time to time and its a neat little gun (and mechanically simple) but Kimber has fallen into the 'big box' store trend with the Micro line. These guns litter the shelves of any and every store that carries a firearm. Quality control needs to be improved and especially for the price. I tried very hard to make this gun what I wanted it to be and swapped out lots of parts but I feel the reliability is still in question. I feel it is NOT an out-of-the-box kind of gun. Kimber CS is top notch and they WILL take good care of you. Kimber CS also admitted to me over the phone that they have lots of returns with their Micro pistols and I am not surprised one bit.

People come to these forums for advice and or suggestions to correct an issue and likely voice some complaints and the common few ALWAYS come back with 'I own 5 Kimbers and not a single problem with one'... That great and all but no one cares about the guns that do work. The fanboys will always waste your time taking about their flawless guns and that will never change. Maybe they need to keep reminding themselves how much they should praise Kimber?

Also - No one wants to hear individuals spew garbage about a life lesson on a pistol forum either. Keep it real! :)
 

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I was enjoying this banter until the part where the Solo flew apart while firing.

C'mon. We all know that only happens with a Taurus :)

Call me skeptical. Picking on the Solo is too easy and the failure described is incredibly unlikely. This reads like a troll to me.
 

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People come to these forums for advice and or suggestions to correct an issue and likely voice some complaints and the common few ALWAYS come back with 'I own 5 Kimbers and not a single problem with one'... That great and all but no one cares about the guns that do work. The fanboys will always waste your time taking about their flawless guns and that will never change. Maybe they need to keep reminding themselves how much they should praise Kimber?

Also - No one wants to hear individuals spew garbage about a life lesson on a pistol forum either. Keep it real! :)
I'm sorry Gary... but "my experience" has only been positive with my Micro 9's..actually all the Micro's if I include the wife's .380. I have nothing else to report...oh wait! I did have a finish issue on my Rapide.

I disagree with your assessment that people don't care to hear about guns that don't work. Everyone that has put out the investment into a new Kimber would indeed like to hear something positive to support their decision. There are quite a few members on this very forum that own trouble free Micro 9's.

I'm by no means a "fan boy" as I carry Sig's, Smith's and HK's too... and ironically, they have run problem free too. I love them all!! Actually, I've been carrying my Smith CSX more lately cuz I just love that little shit.

I'd be willing to bet a large percentage of problems that folks experience are from poor break-in procedure, poor cleaning procedure, and a poor handling procedure when it comes to the proper grip on the M9 pistol. I know I certainly had a learning curve on mine.

I guess I'm just pretty dam lucky when it comes to buying guns that run right out of the box without issues.
 
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I was enjoying this banter until the part where the Solo flew apart while firing.

C'mon. We all know that only happens with a Taurus :)

Call me skeptical. Picking on the Solo is too easy and the failure described is incredibly unlikely. This reads like a troll to me.
That is a huge wall of text, claiming to know the gun inside and out, swearing off any product by the company, claiming to have had to cut and weld a gun....sheesh.
I just chuckle a bit.
 

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I was enjoying this banter until the part where the Solo flew apart while firing.

C'mon. We all know that only happens with a Taurus :)

Call me skeptical. Picking on the Solo is too easy and the failure described is incredibly unlikely. This reads like a troll to me.
I know of a fella that was shooting his Ruger Security Six when the barrel fell off! :eek:
 
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That is a huge wall of text, claiming to know the gun inside and out, swearing off any product by the company, claiming to have had to cut and weld a gun....sheesh.
I just chuckle a bit.
Yes ... I'm pretty sure Kimber's negotiating a contract with him to head up their product development division.
 

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And I don't need to read all the long-winded stories about Micro Nines that worked fine, right out of the box. I now know these pistols forward and backward, inside and out, and I know what the truth is. If some get out the door and work well, with one or two boxes of a certain type of ammo, lucky you. IT IS AN ACCIDENT. In my carry pistol, I want near certainty, not a roll of the dice.

This is not a condemnation of any other model of Kimber pistol. I have no experience with them. And Kimber may change the Micro Nine internal design at any time, for the better. I hope they do and, if so, I wish the company well. But this one...yech!


Couldn't agree more... I still carry mine from time to time and its a neat little gun (and mechanically simple) but Kimber has fallen into the 'big box' store trend with the Micro line. These guns litter the shelves of any and every store that carries a firearm. Quality control needs to be improved and especially for the price. I tried very hard to make this gun what I wanted it to be and swapped out lots of parts but I feel the reliability is still in question. I feel it is NOT an out-of-the-box kind of gun. Kimber CS is top notch and they WILL take good care of you. Kimber CS also admitted to me over the phone that they have lots of returns with their Micro pistols and I am not surprised one bit.

People come to these forums for advice and or suggestions to correct an issue and likely voice some complaints and the common few ALWAYS come back with 'I own 5 Kimbers and not a single problem with one'... That great and all but no one cares about the guns that do work. The fanboys will always waste your time taking about their flawless guns and that will never change. Maybe they need to keep reminding themselves how much they should praise Kimber?

Also - No one wants to hear individuals spew garbage about a life lesson on a pistol forum either. Keep it real! :)
[/QUOTE]

Wow. I definitely wouldn't invest three months and all that work in a $700 pistol. I have a small mill and also a lathe but I'm too amateur to trust my skills to make my own firing pins. Or welding on the frame of a Micro 9. I guess those engineers and machinists at Kimber who make the Micro 9 really don't know what they are doing. Maybe they don't pay them well.

It would be interesting to know from a QA perspective how many out of 100,000 Micro 9's come back with an issue. To achieve Six Sigma, defects in a mass production process must fall in the single digits per million. Kimber claims Six Sigma compliance and their employee recruitment often states Six Sigma certs as a requirement.

Engineering falls under COO Greg Grogan at Kimber America. You should send him the details of all your improvement of the Micro 9.
 

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I'm sorry Gary... but "my experience" has only been positive with my Micro 9's..actually all the Micro's if I include the wife's .380. I have nothing else to report...oh wait! I did have a finish issue on my Rapide.
Don't be Sorry!! I was just stirring the pot, seeing if the same individuals had to comment back - It worked lol :)
I just had to 100% agree with the fact that you'd prolly have to have luck on your side to get a 'perfect' micro, that's all.
I did not know Kimber was 6 Sigma (very interesting and frankly surprising with the amount of complaints we see here)... And COO Greg Grogan / Kimber have got our monies so who are the real idiots that don't like their guns now???

I always appreciate everyone's comments on these forums as long as I am not hearing about embracing some life lesson. Everyone here has helped me in the past tremendously and for that I thank you!
 

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Bad Ninja, feel free to "chuckle a bit", if qualified, but I stand by what I said about knowing this model forward and backward, in the course of spending months trying to make my Micro nine work at all, or reliably. And sure, as I expected, somebody here told how he knows of three Micro Nines that work perfectly. I don't doubt a word of what he said, but again, that is luck.

The real lesson here, the truth of it, is that there is no consistency with what Kimber pushes out the door. It would be charitable to say that their quality control is "spotty". And I could go on about the design problems that make the Micro Nine something you should never, ever trust with your life. All of it could be fixed, if anybody at Kimber cares. And if they do improve quality control, or make small changes in the design, we will never hear about it, because to make such admissions would be to arm plaintiffs' lawyers with the ammo to cause great corporate damage through lawsuits involving pistols of earlier manufacture. And I think that situation is sad and unfair. Manufacturers should feel safe to improve designs when overlooked problems are spotted, but in today's climate, that almost cannot happen.

In the course of trying to get my pistol to work, I did a lot of Internet research, to see if other people had had the same problems, and WOW! The Internet is awash with Kimber horror stories. Sure, none of us can verify them, and sure, some people just love to complain. But do your research and draw your own conclusions.

Another thing I discovered, is that few of the problems with various Kimber models involve a tried-and-true design, as when a manufacturer generally duplicates something like the 1911, and stays with the official specs, for the sake of parts interchangeability. That means safety, reliability, and personal security. I haven't seen many complaints regarding the 1911 variants from Kimber, and that stands in contrast to their Micro Nine.

So again, I only post my comments on the Micro Nine to be helpful to anybody who is not a lifelong gunperson, or gunsmith and gun modifier, confident of taking on what could or could not be a major can of worms. I have other pistols in the same category, really neat and great to look at, but don't trust them an inch. Remember the Detonics .45s? Or some of the super compact Para Ordnance pistols? There are lots of really neat guns out there that aren't worth a you-know-what. I have a few. And I keep them. I refuse to sell them, because it would be dishonest to endanger the life of a stranger who doesn't understand the risk he would be undertaking by carrying the gun for self defense. These guns can be good training aids for a certified instructor, as I am...training on what not to carry, and why. Anybody know anything about the MPA Protector? What a fantastic (looking) little pistol, and what a dangerous, unreliable stinker. I think it has been pulled from the market long ago, or renamed, or morphed into another model, or some such face-saving gymnastics. But I would not give up my NIB Protector for the world. It is the best training aid ever. You can make it work, with extremely low-power handloads which would put the fear of God into squirrels, at point blank range.
 

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I am inclined to agree about Kimber's QA. But as I said once before I think this is by design. They expect a certain number of pistols to come back.

About the Micro 9… one thing I am certain of is that like the Solo it is very intolerant to limp wristing and can be finicky about certain ammo.

New gun owners or those who may have only had very reliable pistols like a Glock or Shield prior to buying a Kimber can be impatient with the obligatory break-in that Kimber’s require. I also know a lot of gun owners, like golfers, don’t train enough or never learned proper technique in the first place. Then blame the gun and clubs. I was a caddy at age 14. I have seen and heard every excuse in the world - when the root cause was poor form. Usually from the fat guy wearing red pants and green shirt who had a $2000 set of clubs. He should have bought the $500 clubs and put $1500 into lessons. The same holds true with pistols.

Is poor form in pistol shooting always the cause of reliability issues? Of course not. But you can bet your shaved brass it is a high percentage.

I have two Micro 9s two Micro 380s, and two Solos. Beyond the recommended periodic spring replacements, I haven’t had to weld, cut or modify any of them. None are perfect. But none defective. I’ve put a lot of rounds thru all of them. What you feed them matters.

I once received an expensive watch as a gift. It took two trips back to the factory in Switzerland to make it run as it should. I admit that was disappointing. That also never happens with a $70 Timex. If everyone will pardon another analogy, if you buy an exotic car and bitch about the maintenance, your wallet was bigger than your brain. We are all guilty of this at some time or another.

The Micro 9 is not 1911. It just looks like one. Don't hate it just because it's pretty. And like other pretty things can be higher maintenance. A fugly Glock will never let you down and you only have to clean it once a year.
 

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A fugly Glock will never let you down and you only have to clean it once a year.
DungFu,

Those words of wisdom are the bottom line. Is the gun "for serious", or for admiration and entertainment?

I have a large number of firearms in all categories, and most of them are for my enjoyment as a lifelong collector, shooter, and reloader having done that for 73 years now.

I really have an aversion to plastic guns, and even guns with aluminum alloy in them, or MIM cast parts. It took me years before I was willing to buy any plastic frame pistol.

So I have to make a grudging admission, unwillingly. When my life might again depend upon it, as in a previous profession overseas, it is the plastic Glock. It----will----shoot. All the time, every time, carrying each round which I have personally loaded.

So I could not more enthusiastically endorse your words of wisdom. As do an ever increasing number of law enforcement, security, and intelligence organizations. In that community, I doubt that you will spot many Micro Nines.

Oh yes, while I would not "have to" clean the Glock more than once a year, I clean it after firing even a couple rounds. It is good, safe practice. I am always certain of the pistol's state of readiness. I have physically examined it before pulling the trigger.
 

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Bad Ninja, feel free to "chuckle a bit", if qualified, but I stand by what I said about knowing this model forward and backward, in the course of spending months trying to make my Micro nine work at all, or reliably. And sure, as I expected, somebody here told how he knows of three Micro Nines that work perfectly. I don't doubt a word of what he said, but again, that is luck.

The real lesson here, the truth of it, is that there is no consistency with what Kimber pushes out the door. It would be charitable to say that their quality control is "spotty". And I could go on about the design problems that make the Micro Nine something you should never, ever trust with your life. All of it could be fixed, if anybody at Kimber cares. And if they do improve quality control, or make small changes in the design, we will never hear about it, because to make such admissions would be to arm plaintiffs' lawyers with the ammo to cause great corporate damage through lawsuits involving pistols of earlier manufacture. And I think that situation is sad and unfair. Manufacturers should feel safe to improve designs when overlooked problems are spotted, but in today's climate, that almost cannot happen.

In the course of trying to get my pistol to work, I did a lot of Internet research, to see if other people had had the same problems, and WOW! The Internet is awash with Kimber horror stories. Sure, none of us can verify them, and sure, some people just love to complain. But do your research and draw your own conclusions.

Another thing I discovered, is that few of the problems with various Kimber models involve a tried-and-true design, as when a manufacturer generally duplicates something like the 1911, and stays with the official specs, for the sake of parts interchangeability. That means safety, reliability, and personal security. I haven't seen many complaints regarding the 1911 variants from Kimber, and that stands in contrast to their Micro Nine.

So again, I only post my comments on the Micro Nine to be helpful to anybody who is not a lifelong gunperson, or gunsmith and gun modifier, confident of taking on what could or could not be a major can of worms. I have other pistols in the same category, really neat and great to look at, but don't trust them an inch. Remember the Detonics .45s? Or some of the super compact Para Ordnance pistols? There are lots of really neat guns out there that aren't worth a you-know-what. I have a few. And I keep them. I refuse to sell them, because it would be dishonest to endanger the life of a stranger who doesn't understand the risk he would be undertaking by carrying the gun for self defense. These guns can be good training aids for a certified instructor, as I am...training on what not to carry, and why. Anybody know anything about the MPA Protector? What a fantastic (looking) little pistol, and what a dangerous, unreliable stinker. I think it has been pulled from the market long ago, or renamed, or morphed into another model, or some such face-saving gymnastics. But I would not give up my NIB Protector for the world. It is the best training aid ever. You can make it work, with extremely low-power handloads which would put the fear of God into squirrels, at point blank range.


Let's see if I understand this correctly:

We have a gun with a problem, that isn't covered by warranty due to the owner's "gunsmithing".

Instead of paying Kimber to fix the gun, the owners decided the best plan of action requires "cutting and welding".

Had the owner paid Kimber to fix the gun, it would have be sorted without said cutting or welding by the actual Gunsmiths at Kimber

So, yes...I will laugh when the "welder" says he is "offended" by someone questioning his skills and referring to his actions as "Bubba Smithing", because that is the very definition of the term.
Personally, I find the claims extraordinary, and would love to see pictures of the expert welding work.
 
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