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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm still relatively new to the forum but have noticed a trend. I have recently purchased my first two Kimbers. A Warrior SOC (with 200 flawless rounds of Remington UMC 230 grain MC so far) and an Eclipse Custom II 10mm (which I haven't shot yet). I did a significant amount of due diligence before jumping in to my first purchase. Now I'm just flat hooked!

Anyway, I've notice so many questions and concerns from people who haven't gone through the basic break in process. Now don't get me wrong, I never ask for directions when I'm lost, but I do read the owners manual of every gun I purchase (I have a modestl gathering if guns).

Many of the Kimber criticisms I read about are from people with "friends" that have less than 500 rounds down range. With my limited experience I believe Kimber's tolerances are so tight they need the break in period. I've read many threads on this forum asking questions before the break in period.

To digress even more, when I picked up my Eclipse last week my local FFL told me they don't sell Kimber because he has too many problems. He told me too many people have FTE or FTF after just 150 or 200 rounds. I asked if he ever read the owners manual. He looked at me like I had three heads. At that point I wasn't going to argue with ignorance.

So.... I'd be curious to hear the seasoned Kimber owner's thoughts from this forum. Is it just me or is it a common problem? Do peiople assume they don't have to read the manual? Does Kimber need to do a better job of educating people? Does Kimber need to do a better job of educating their dealers? Does Kimber need to put a big red sticker (got that from a thread on this forum) that makes sure people know to "break in" their new machine?

Please give me your thoughts. The break in period seems to be more critical to Kimber than other manufacturers. If so, they need to market accordingly.

I'm not doing anything to my Kimbers before I run 500 rounds of MC through them. I've enjoyed learning from all of you and will continue to absorb your knowledge and experience. Kimber needs to spread Break In word in my opinion!
 

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I don't have a answer for why people don't think they have to brake in a new Kimber and I have known of some who did not and got ride of the gun before it was properly cleaned and lubed, I also know of some Ruger SR9 that did not run before 2 to 3 hundred rounds.
 

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I agree. The break in period for Kimbers is more intense than other more common 45's. However, when compared to higher dollar custom pieces, the break in is relatively short. It's all in the built in tolerances. Every gun is machined, to some degree. If the tolerances are close, as with the Kimber, the break in will be longer. Bottom line, tolerance equals accuracy. The closer they tolerance the better the accuracy. When it comes to auto loaders, there is no truer statement.
 

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Well as I always say. When all else fails read the instructions! I've found over the years that gun shop employees and a lot of owners really don't know squat about their products. Kimber dealers are no exception!
 

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I was one of the guys who looked squirly at the guy shooting a Kimber at the range until the first time I was offered to shoot one.It was love at first sight feeling that 45 in my hands and popping a mag down range.I was so impressed with it that I almost broke wood and stretched the ole zipper out.That was a year ago and 4 Kimbers later.Maybe the marketing plan can be improved but until then it will take people like us to spread the word.I can't tell you how much ammo I have used letting others try out my Kimbers,but I like watching the same guys walk back into the range weeks later showing me their first new one.
 

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One of the most common problems with Kimbers is the owner that fails to read or believe the owners manual. (Do a forum search and find the story about how I bought a new $1200.00 gun for $500.00.) Kimber isn't the only manufacture that recommends breaking in a gun. Most quality handguns state somewhere in their owners manual that a prescribed a break in procedure should be followed. So to answer your question yes, I believe in following the recommended factory break in procedure.

As for Kimber spreading the word on breaking in their guns, they do, it's in every owners manual that's included with every gun they sell.
 

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I don't believe ... I bought a new Kimber Ultra no less
I cleaned it brought 4 different kinds of ammo and shot the heck out of it
No problems at all... Folks worry to much
Funny funny.. Do you drive 35 breaking in a new car. Haha
 

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I don't believe ... I bought a new Kimber Ultra no less
I cleaned it brought 4 different kinds of ammo and shot the heck out of it
No problems at all... Folks worry to much
Funny funny.. Do you drive 35 breaking in a new car. Haha
I'm not sure I understand. You cleaned and lubed your gun and shot a lot. That is what Kimber tells you to do. What don't you believe and what's funny?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One of the most common problems with Kimbers is the owner that fails to read or believe the owners manual. (Do a forum search and find the story about how I bought a new $1200.00 gun for $500.00.) Kimber isn't the only manufacture that recommends breaking in a gun. Most quality handguns state somewhere in their owners manual that a prescribed a break in procedure should be followed. So to answer your question yes, I believe in following the recommended factory break in procedure.

As for Kimber spreading the word on breaking in their guns, they do, it's in every owners manual that's included with every gun they sell.
That's my point... It is in the manual, but it appears too many people don't read the manual and go out and complain. Kimber does their job by including it, but I'm wondering if they need to go further to help the brand by educating dealers and the like.
 

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That's my point... It is in the manual, but it appears too many people don't read the manual and go out and complain. Kimber does their job by including it, but I'm wondering if they need to go further to help the brand by educating dealers and the like.
Well, I guess they could put a big bright colored card in with every gun that says, "WHEN ALL ELSE FAILS READ THE INSTRUCTIONS!!!"
 

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Kimber does their job by including it, but I'm wondering if they need to go further to help the brand by educating dealers and the like.
How about if they make customers take a pre-owner test before they sell them the gun? Ask them 5 questions about a Kimber and if they can't answer them all correctly they have settle for a Glock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think you guys took what I was saying the wrong way...

I wasn't trying to trivialize anything. I'm just curious how to get the word out in a better way. Maybe there isn't one.
 

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As my late father used to say, "I may be ignern't but I ain't stupid".....

I admit I hate reading instructions and manuals and I did not read mine before firing my Kimber. (I just read the whole thing just now out of respect for the point you guys are making. Better late than never.) My eyes did glaze over a bit.

As a first-time gun owner, it was not obvious to me that a gun needed to be taken apart and cleaned before it was ever shot. (There. I said it.) I had shot other people's pistols, bought my older son one last year and had shot with him a couple times, so I did know the basic operation and safety steps. I paid more attention to safe handling than cleaning. I know enough to keep my finger off the trigger until I'm ready to fire. (Unlike some I've seen at the range.) I figured I learn to clean it as soon as I shot it and it was dirty.

I also figured I'd learn as most people do....forums!
Just kidding. I went to YouTube.

Anyway, I have cleaned and oiled it after every time I have shot. I've now put 1000 rounds through it. I hate to admit it, but yes, I've had one single FTF at about 750 rounds. I've used good ammo, so I'm blaming the standard issue Kimber magazine for that one. But with that one exception, it has shot flawlessly.

I don't really understand the "break-in period" though. I mean, once it's broken in, what would I do differently? Not clean it every time? That just seems wrong!

Oh well. That's my confession. If anyone can absolve me, I'd appreciate it.
 

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Great OP with observation and questions.

My point of view is:

1. There are far too many people like myself who adhere to the maxim of, "When all else fails, read the directions." I know, I should not be that way, but .... there it is.

(first time out, had 5 FTF in the first hundred rounds. I complained to the club smith. He shot it with some PMC and all went well. I up graded my ammo and continued to shoot. It smoothed right out. Then I went home and read the manual :duh: ) Second trip to the range was even smoother.

2. There are a lot of people who purchase handguns with the semi-conscious notion of using it for self/home defense. They don't want to target shoot and will probably not practice as they should. Therefore they never reach 500 rounds fired the entire time they own the weapon. I've owned guns that never saw 500 rounds. I decided I did not like them and disposed/sold/traded prior to 500.

So, yes, Kimber probably needs to have a BIG RED STICKER explaining the need for and the process of break-in. Dealers need to forewarn customers of the tight tolerances. If they are not prepared to shoot the gun A LOT, then they need to buy a Glock or S&W. YMMV
 
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Insta-Gator,
Your comment about people wanting a gun for home defense but never shooting them is interesting, I guess because I'm the opposite. I live out in the country where total strangers wave at you and I really doubt I'll ever have to whack a bad guy. I do believe it is good to be prepared....I just don't worry too much about it.

But I do love to shoot targets which is why I bought my gun and why I bought a $1000 Kimber 1911 instead of a $400 piece of plastic.

A gun not being shot is rather sad. Didn't Dr. Suess do a book on that? Maybe not.
 

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I would love to know actual statistics of the number of handgun buyers who purchased because (1) they were afraid the government was going to outlaw them, or (2) saw a bunch of criminal activity reported on the news and thought it prudent to own a gun (poor plan if they don't develop of level of proficiency)

Yeah, we live about 30 miles from Atlanta, so people are pretty friendly. Not like when I was a kid where everyone waved as cars passed (some still do) or you honked a tune as you passed the house of a friend just to say, "Hi" as you went by.

But the point I was trying to make is that I believe there are far too many people with handguns that have no idea had to properly handle/shoot them.
 
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I don't really understand the "break-in period" though. I mean, once it's broken in, what would I do differently? Not clean it every time? That just seems wrong!
The break in procedure consist of cleaning the gun BEFORE firing it for the first time. Then they ask you to shoot 500 rounds using a quality 230gr FMJ bullet, no wad-cutters or hollow points and clean it every 100 - 150 rounds. The idea is to keep the gun clean and well lubed during break in.

After it's broken in feel free to try target ammo, hollow points or what ever strikes your fancy and clean it when you feel it's needs cleaning.
 

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The break in procedure consist of cleaning the gun BEFORE firing it for the first time. Then they ask you to shoot 500 rounds using a quality 230gr FMJ bullet, no wad-cutters or hollow points and clean it every 100 - 150 rounds. The idea is to keep the gun clean and well lubed during break in.

After it's broken in feel free to try target ammo, hollow points or what ever strikes your fancy and clean it when you feel it's needs cleaning.
Thanks Chuck. I already admitted to F-ing up shooting mine out of the box, so I'm absolved of my sins.....I think. No more flogging. But I don't plan on shooting any cheap ammo and I always clean after shooting. If I shoot 50 I clean it. Since all I do is shoot targets, all I have shot is FMJs. I suppose I'll get hollow points when I am ready to carry.

I did learn one new thing reading the manual....that is how much oil to use. "Don't over oil" which is what I figured. I don't like the thought of the gun being too wet with oil.

I did learn that the first spring change is at 800 rounds. Learned that here on this forum. After 800 rounds. :rolleyes:
 

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You would be surprised at how many experienced Kimber owners don't realize the importance of changing the springs or know how often they should be changed. I feel that keeping a shot book makes it easier to track spring life especially when you own two or more guns.
 
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