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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New full size LW Stainless. Bought some nice aftermarket grips. Went to take off the factory grips and one bushing came off with the grip. Guess I’ll be going to the local hardware store for some Blue Loctite?
 
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I’ve had that happen to me. I had to use pliers to get the screw out of the bushing which screwed up the bushing. Picked up a new bushing and added some loctite. It worked just fine. I also put o-rings under the head of the screw to keep the screws tight.
 

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As long as the threads in the frame are not stripped out, it'll be fine.
 
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Guess I’ll be going to the local hardware store for some Blue Loctite?
I use Challis bushings and O-rings exclusively these days. They are the best of the best. Using these bushings and O-rings eliminates the need for staking or loctite even when using G10 grips.

For many years prior to switching over to Challis I used Red Loctite on the bushing threads. If I ever needed to remove a bushing, I held a soldering iron to the bushing until a little puff of smoke appeared indicating the loctite was ready to let go.
 

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DONT USE LOCTIGHT
You will be replacing bushings… unless you never want to replace or take off your grips.. I used blue and had a heck of a time and ended up buying some new bushings… better to just check them upon cleaning… just my .02
 

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I don't change up grips often but have a few extra bushings and screw sets in my spare parts inventory. Using O rings has always been enough to keep everything tight.
On the locktite, I believe the blue is designed so it can be removed without the aid of heat, the red is listed as needing heat and is more for permanent applications. I've only ever used either for larger fasteners on motorcycles and cars...
 

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222 purple small screw locktite
LOCTITE 222 Purple Threadlocker prevents loosening from shock or vibration, but also allows for simple, hand-tool disassembly without shearing the screw. LOCTITE® 222MS™ Low Strength, Small Screw, Mil-Spec Purple Threadlocker is ideal for fastener diameters of 1/4" (6mm) and smaller.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Kudos to Kimber Service. Two week turnaround including shipping from/to LGS; they put in a new grip bushing, and also reamed the chamber, polished the feed ramp, breech face & firing pin housing, and refinished the barrel, tested it with 3 mags of FMJ and one of JHP, then cleaned and lubed it, and got it back to me 2nd day air. (y)

(PS: All this was no charge to me, not even the shipping.)
 

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Two week turnaround including shipping from/to LGS; they put in a new grip bushing, and also reamed the chamber, polished the feed ramp, breech face & firing pin housing, and refinished the barrel, tested it with 3 mags of FMJ and one of JHP, then cleaned and lubed it, and got it back to me 2nd day air. (y)
That IS great customer service.

Forgive my ignorance; what is the firing pin housing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I’m no smith, so I’m guessing here, but probably the ‘channel’ it rides in?

(ETA: I took the terminology from the invoice they sent back with the gun.)
 

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Forgive my ignorance; what is the firing pin housing?
I’m no smith, so I’m guessing here, but probably the ‘channel’ it rides in?
You're undoubtedly correct. I've just never heard it referred to like that.

Kuhnhausen refers to it as the "firing pin passage" and the "firing pin bore". I've called it the "slide's firing pin hole" although that could also mean the firing pin port in the breechface.

Then there's the mainspring housing that contains the mainspring (hammer spring). But "housing" implies a part that can be removed from the pistol.

So much terminology.
 

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Nice that they took the time to put a hex on them. That makes SO much more sense.
I use Challis on all my 1911s because of the bushing's hex design. it really makes it so much easier to put them in and out, especially in, since it's easier with a hex driver socket to back them out a little when putting them in thus avoiding the awful, "stripped frame threads" syndrome. They also suggest using an o-ring under the bushing and give specific torquing information for steel and aluminum frames. Great company.
 
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