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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
Part of routine field stripping, cleaning and reassembly is testing the safety after cleaning and reassembly (while still unloaded). It should be done every time you reassemble the pistol, and can confirm that the safety is working to protect you. Cocked and locked is the mode that the pistol is designed for.
Yes... I agree. I always check when cleaning. To be honest....a few times a week... I unload and check again. Just for peace of mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #103 ·
It sounds like you may be new to guns/cc, so good for you for taking the plunge and joining the club. That being said, train, then train some more, then train, then when you’re feeling really good…TRAIN SOME MORE. I use to teach cc and had this brought up by my students, personally I hate guns with safeties for self defense and cc unless you’ve done extensive training. I know every 1911 lover on here is nashing and grinding their teeth right now cracking their knuckles and getting ready to reply, and that’s ok. Again, my opinion, and MOST law enforcement officers, instructors, and agencies that I have dealt with over the years. There is a reason MOST of those agencies carry Glocks or Sigs without safeties. The simple answer is they are faster and under extreme pressure a safety (by those that haven’t been properly trained) can often be more of a con than a pro. It’s said over and over but it’s true, the most important safety is a straight trigger finger. I have around 15-16 pistols and the only one that has a safety is my AR pistol. All my others are either striker fired or dao. I recently bought the new Kimber Mako, and it’s amazing, I absolutely love it. No safety, striker fired, and shoots great. As one of the other guys said on here there aren’t too many negligent discharges if you have a good holster, but in the time it will take you to draw, correctly chamber a round, then get rounds down range, UNDER STRESS, you may be regretting it. I know some people will tell you to wear it around the house, use dummy rounds for safety, practice drawing and reholstering, etc… Watch youtube (not the idiots) and find some good channels there, talk to trusted instructors, law enforcement, military, and long time cc gun owners with experience take a little bit from everyone and then do what works best for you. Okay 1911 guys, I’m ready, full send…😂
Right now I carry in my pocket Cocked and locked. In a hip holster I don't engage the safety. I have a holster that clicks snug . I love this gun.
 

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No, that's an outside the waste band pancake holster. If that particular one isn't from 1791 Gunleather, it looks just like them.
 
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Is this a pocket holster? Where can I find such an animal?
I have made several types of pocket holsters. I was typically carrying a K40 which for a small gun is very heavy. I now carry my Micro with the same style pocket holster. The Micro is so lite I do not even notice it now in my pocket. The good thing you cannot even see any printing when worn with any untucked shirts. The holster is totally supported by and when sitting the gun folds with you.


Denim Outdoor shoe Bag Waist Athletic shoe
Sleeve Bag Waist Wood Electric blue
Wood Everyday carry Hardwood Revolver Office supplies
 

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Interesting thread with lots of good data.

Being a new Micro 9 owner (STG), I’ve been reading, analyzing, and practicing every carry mode that I can come up with at the range. I have tried to duplicate AD scenarios with the gun pointed down the lane. Here’s what I’ve found so far:

1) with the barrel loaded, hammer cocked, safety on: I can’t get the gun to fire. Period. I have banged the hammer, the slide, pulled the trigger - nothing. It’s locked.

2) with the barrel loaded and the hammer down, I have intentionally pulled the hammer half-way and let it slip at least twenty times. The hammer falls to the secondary notch (half cock) and goes no further. Period. Safety on, safety off - no difference.

3) with the barrel loaded, hammer on secondary notch (half cock), pulling the trigger will let the hammer fall - safety ON OR OFF. No fire. I’ve done this at least twenty times. No fire.

In addition to all of the comments and experience posted above and intentionally disregarding the MANUAL for the sake of personal “proof” (which I have read 6 times), I have comfortably concluded that carrying, handling, holstering and drawing this pistol while cocked, locked is completely safe.

One point of conflict I’ve experienced with one post above:

With a loaded mag, unloaded barrel (Israeli), hammer down, SAFETY ON: I cannot rack the slide to load the pistol. It definitely appears to me that the slide is locked forward (hammer prevented from moving beyond the secondary notch -“half cock”) witch prevents the slide from moving more than 1/8” or so out of battery. In this condition, the slide cannot be operated with the safety on.

Thanks to any/all who might be able to enlighten/correct/validate that last paragraph.

What a great pistol!

Cheers,

TW
 

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nice holster.
I have carried a 1911 gun since Feb of 1967 while I was in Vietnam and while there actually slept with it! Cocked and locked does work but practice is necessary.
While in Vietnam is witness an accidental discharge of a 1911, Army Issue weapon, when the weapon was carried with one round in the chamber and the hammer down in a military full flap holster. The fellow was jumping off the top of an Armored Personnel Carrier, mine, and his holster muzzle hit a metal rail get before he hit the ground. The pistol discharged and blew a nice hole in the bottom of the holster and woke him and everyone else up. Chipped the paint on my APC and got a good scolding from the sergeant. That weapon had no firing pin block and the hammer was not hit nor the trigger pulled in any way. If it had been equipped with a firing pin block as John Browning designed it then the weapon would not have discharged.
All that said, cocked and locked and in a proper holster is the quickest and safest way to carry the weapon.
I have carried concealed legally since about 1975 and illegally since 1968 and never had a weapon fire accidentally.
 

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With a loaded mag, unloaded barrel (Israeli), hammer down, SAFETY ON: I cannot rack the slide to load the pistol. It definitely appears to me that the slide is locked forward (hammer prevented from moving beyond the secondary notch -“half cock”) witch prevents the slide from moving more than 1/8” or so out of battery. In this condition, the slide cannot be operated with the safety on.

Thanks to any/all who might be able to enlighten/correct/validate that last paragraph.

What a great pistol!

Cheers,

TW
Let me peface my answer with an excerpt from page 37 of the Micro 9 manual.

"Hammer safety notch (half cock position) The hammer safety notch is a recess in the hammer which prevents it from traveling fully forward in the event of primary sear notch failure. It also prevents the hammer from contacting the firing pin if fingers slip from the slide or hammer while cocking the firearm if the hammer has moved past the stop. The safety notch is not, however, a manual safety. Do not, under any circumstance, use the safety notch as a safety. The safety notch is not a manual safety. Do not use the safety notch as a safety. This creates an unsafe condition that could result in damage to the sear and/or unintentional discharge that could result in death, serious injury or property damage."

That pretty well summarizes why you should not use the hammer in a half cock position. Also in the half cock position the hammer can be fired thus driving the firing pin into a light strike on the cartridge primer. There could be a chance of the firearm discharging in that condition. DON'T DO IT THAT WAY!

A nice feature of the Micro 9 is you can cock the hammer, flip the safety on, insert a magazine and rack the slide to load the pistol.
 

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Cocked and locked does work but practice is necessary.
While in Vietnam is witness an accidental discharge of a 1911, Army Issue weapon, when the weapon was carried with one round in the chamber and the hammer down in a military full flap holster.
Guns don't discharge accidentally.
It was a negligent discharge.

Carrying a 1911 with a round chambered and the hammer down means the safety was off.
It wasn't cocked or locked, it was carried in an unsafe condition, which was clear negligence.

I'm pretty sure that dumbass wasn't trained to carry a 1911 in such an unsafe condition.
The 1911 was designed to be carried cocked and locked, and is the safest way to carry one.
 

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Let me peface my answer with an excerpt from page 37 of the Micro 9 manual.

"Hammer safety notch (half cock position) The hammer safety notch is a recess in the hammer which prevents it from traveling fully forward in the event of primary sear notch failure. It also prevents the hammer from contacting the firing pin if fingers slip from the slide or hammer while cocking the firearm if the hammer has moved past the stop. The safety notch is not, however, a manual safety. Do not, under any circumstance, use the safety notch as a safety. The safety notch is not a manual safety. Do not use the safety notch as a safety. This creates an unsafe condition that could result in damage to the sear and/or unintentional discharge that could result in death, serious injury or property damage."

That pretty well summarizes why you should not use the hammer in a half cock position. Also in the half cock position the hammer can be fired thus driving the firing pin into a light strike on the cartridge primer. There could be a chance of the firearm discharging in that condition. DON'T DO IT THAT WAY!

A nice feature of the Micro 9 is you can cock the hammer, flip the safety on, insert a magazine and rack the slide to load the pistol.
My post described an intentional effort to create the conditions similar to an ND. Familiarity with the mechanism requires seeing it in all configurations (safely). I’m not suggesting an off-cuff manual of arms revision.

Absolutely agreed - this model should never be carried in half cock. Noteworthy (to me): the trigger will release the sear from half cock with the safety on. ‘The manual does not explain this - just wanted to point that out.

Thanks,

TW
 
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