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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Mike, ninja's statement right there say it all. It's obvious your FIL was never in the military, nor has any real firearms experience whatsoever. I'd keep him and his advice as far away from you and your pistol as possible. But from my time in the military, reading your first post gave me this thought after reading your FIL's "advice".....



I'm still chuckling at his 'advice', as I'm sure other vets and experienced shooters here are too. This is this weeks classic example of "Misinformation"!
As the others have opined, I field strip and clean every weapon I fire once home. If cared for properly, your weapon will outlast you. IF cared for properly......
He just sprays the crap out of his guns with gun cleaner and gun oil he tells me that’s what his
Cheif master Sargent . E9
30 years . Strategic Air Command dad taught him
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Mike, ninja's statement right there say it all. It's obvious your FIL was never in the military, nor has any real firearms experience whatsoever. I'd keep him and his advice as far away from you and your pistol as possible. But from my time in the military, reading your first post gave me this thought after reading your FIL's "advice".....



I'm still chuckling at his 'advice', as I'm sure other vets and experienced shooters here are too. This is this weeks classic example of "Misinformation"!
As the others have opined, I field strip and clean every weapon I fire once home. If cared for properly, your weapon will outlast you. IF cared for properly......
He just sprays the crap out of his guns with gun cleaner and gun oil he tells me that’s what his
Mike, ninja's statement right there say it all. It's obvious your FIL was never in the military, nor has any real firearms experience whatsoever. I'd keep him and his advice as far away from you and your pistol as possible. But from my time in the military, reading your first post gave me this thought after reading your FIL's "advice".....



I'm still chuckling at his 'advice', as I'm sure other vets and experienced shooters here are too. This is this weeks classic example of "Misinformation"!
As the others have opined, I field strip and clean every weapon I fire once home. If cared for properly, your weapon will outlast you. IF cared for properly......
 

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He just sprays the crap out of his guns with gun cleaner and gun oil he tells me that’s what his
Cheif master Sargent . E9
30 years . Strategic Air Command dad taught him
That explains alot.

Two generations that didn't know how to maintain their weapons.
Don't take gun advice from people that don't own and regularly use alot of guns.

The Chief sure as shit didn't learn that from the Military.
 

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Thank you everyone that has been help I’m still relatively new to gun owning and he just had me so confused of what I was taught by my gun nut deputy sheriff friend
👍
Stick with the gun nut.
Especially if his guns are clean and well maintained.



🤣
Now I shoot with a few local LEOs.
Honestly, I would only trust one of them to clean my guns.
They are all good guys, but I give them a ton of sh!t about their gun handling and shooting.
I'm a medicore shot at best, old, bad eyes, and out of shape and I can outshoot all of our local county LEOs except one.
 

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I made myself learn to field strip my Kimber 1911 Target ll after the first range visit. To become proficient I’d field strip to clean & lube after each range session. It’s actually become kinda fun knowing each time I go back to the range that it’s in as good a condition as possible to shoot again. To date I’ve not seen any concerns in doing this. Cheers,
 

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My father in law says that field stripping my Kimber ultra carry II will loosen parts up that shouldn’t be loose. Is that true or can I field strip/ clean it and not worry about parts getting loose?
Field stripping is an essential function to maintain the firearm in full operating condition. Some people will field strip after every use. Some will field strip after x amount of rounds fired. So it is pretty subjective. It can also depend upon the type and quality of the ammo fired. Some are more dirty than others. I.E. firing lead bullets may leave lead disposits that will ultimately effect the operation and accurancy. The only time I every read firearms instruction manual to limit the take down (disassembly) was the US TM for the M1 carbine which lists field stripping but recommeded not to disassenble the carbine to often. This has to do more with bedding the barrel to thee wood stock with the potential to cause excessive wear- thus reducing accurancy.

Normal wear and usage will also cause the parts to begin to make loose noise. But that may take 20,40,000 round first.
 

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I field strip and clean after each 200 rounds or so with any and all pistols unless something isn’t “just right” at the range and then it’s more frequently.

For EDC, I never carry a pistol that’s just been f-stripped and cleaned. After any reassembly, I want at least one mag’s worth down the barrel before I the weapon is considered 100%.

YMMV
 

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For EDC, I never carry a pistol that’s just been f-stripped and cleaned. After any reassembly, I want at least one mag’s worth down the barrel before I the weapon is considered 100%.

YMMV
I understand your reasoning.
I function check after stripping and cleaning my EDC pretty thoroughly.
As long as no parts were changed, I trust my ability to reassemble it properly.
 

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I understand your reasoning.
I function check after stripping and cleaning my EDC pretty thoroughly.
As long as no parts were changed, I trust my ability to reassemble it properly.
I go through periods of very low shooting activity and might not feel as confident regarding “currency.” For regulars, I think your approach is entirely reasonable.

(y)
 

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Even if he meant to say, “detail strip,” he’s still wrong. Field stripping is completely routine, and the bushing and barrel fit will be worn in by normal functioning during recoil. Giving the bushing a little rotation to remove would have less than negligible affect over the life of the barrel.

You need to field strip, and learn to detail strip. Launching springs across the kitchen is part of 1911 ownership, it’s Americana. Don’t deny yourself this piece of your heritage.
 

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...10 days of field stripping... ...I have a table in the garage that has a granite top (the piece that was cut for the electric 5 burner stove top) and it is great for gun disassembly and assembly (field stripping and cleaning) and it has a fridge on one side and a wall along the front so the little springs can half way be contained.... (read old eyes and fingers)
 
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