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The modified spring is still longer than the OEM one and has at least an equal to but probably higher spring rate. I don't see this as a problem. As I'd mentioned before, the pull-back on the slide requires more force than it did with the OEM spring. With all this theoretical conjecture the proof will be in the pudding, range firing.
Yup, longer than OEM for now. If you measure it before and after the each range trip you'll see a change. It's probably a better option for hotter ammo. I found a heavy spring threw the timing with standard ammo? I'm only suggesting until you give her a go with the +P ammo or standard stuff for that matter there's no way to know about function and lifespan.

I'm looking forward to your review and findings 🤞🏼
 

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Seems to me one of the biggest drawbacks of +P ammo in these small guns is not practicing with it. Practicing with standard ammo but carrying +P doesn't seem ideal to me. I practice with 124gr Fed American Eagle and carry 124gr Fed HST. Shoots the same.

Additional commentary:

Ammunition

We shot some +P ammo in the Micro 9, but we cannot recommend it. This is no indictment of Kimber or the otherwise fine Micro—indeed, the Kimber is rated for it, and the two varieties we shot produced impressive accuracy (Hornady Critical Defense/135 and Creedmoor SST/124). Rather, it’s a recognition of those physical (and physics) realities: These extremely energetic ammunition types exaggerate all the things that make small guns difficult to master—dramatic recoil signatures, muzzle flashes and report. Down the line, you may want or need to step up your defensive ammo to this level, but do so only after substantial practice, and knowing full well what you’re getting into.


Agree Phil. I've fired at least one magazine full of Speer Gold Bonded 185gr JHP +P in all of my Ultra's and a few of the other 1911 Kimber's. Doing that showed me that my "first shot" in a self defense situation had better be a damn good one because a quick, accurate second or third shot is going to be very difficult...
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Yup, longer than OEM for now. If you measure it before and after the each range trip you'll see a change. It's probably a better option for hotter ammo. I found a heavy spring threw the timing with standard ammo? I'm only suggesting until you give her a go with the +P ammo or standard stuff for that matter there's no way to know about function and lifespan.

I'm looking forward to your review and findings 🤞🏼
I'll compare it to the OEM spring after the firing, a known distance (1/4" longer than the OEM spring). Just another thought, this IS NOT my range gun. I only take it to the range for "proofing". This gun is only used for its intended function, self defense. I have my 5" 1911 for accuracy enjoyment. Hense, not a lot of rounds ran through it. In my case I don't see "potential" premature spring fatigue as an issue. I will compare it afterwards to satisfy myself and the group.

BTW. I'm 3 weeks after a total knee replacement so please don't expect results in a day or so.
 

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There may be another issue.
The compressed length of the stock recoil spring and spring plug limits the max travel of the slide on some pistols.

i.e. remember guide rod shock buffs? Little rubbers at the breach end of the recoil spring. You couldn't use these on every gun/spring combo. That extra 1/8" and the slide didn't go back far enough to pick up a bullet.

Physically too short leads to sloppy/weak lockup!
 

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@undy how's the knee coming along? Takes a bit for them to heal up.

Have you take that Micro 9 out yet and excercise that new spring?
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
@undy how's the knee coming along? Takes a bit for them to heal up.

Have you take that Micro 9 out yet and excercise that new spring?
No chance yet. As far as my healing... Paul, George, Ringo & John once said, It's a long and winding road.
 

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FWIW, I was able to install the Galloway spring which was indeed very difficult. The technique demonstrated in the video was what ultimately worked for me.
The stiffer Galloway is definitely noticeable, but the factory spring works too.
 

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Not sure why Rusty recanted his post. IIRC he was correct.

Recoil springs in guns are designed to work under significant preload from the beginning of cycle. By shortening the spring the OP decreased spring preload which made it easier for him to install.

Shortening the spring and reducing preload affected two things. Most critically, it reduced the spring's original force at the end of the cycle to return the slide to battery. It also changed the overall timing and reduced spring resistance throughout the cycle.

Those of us who have ever loaded a magazine know that spring resistances becomes increasingly more difficult from first round to last. Imagine taking out the magazine spring and cutting it in half. Spring preload will be reduced and the spring will deliver less resistance from first round to last compared to the original spring. Same thing with a shortened recoil spring.

It's silly to fret about slide to frame battering with a gun that the owner says he's going to shoot very little anyway. Dicking with a spring to accommodate user assembly is misguided.
 

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I just ordered a Galloway recoil spring and it is nowhere near 22 lbs. I compressed it on a scale and it was 13lbs, only 1 lb stiffer than the stock spring. It was a tad longer though (about 3/4 inch).
 

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Not sure why Rusty recanted his post. IIRC he was correct.

Recoil springs in guns are designed to work under significant preload from the beginning of cycle. By shortening the spring the OP decreased spring preload which made it easier for him to install.

Shortening the spring and reducing preload affected two things. Most critically, it reduced the spring's original force at the end of the cycle to return the slide to battery. It also changed the overall timing and reduced spring resistance throughout the cycle.

Those of us who have ever loaded a magazine know that spring resistances becomes increasingly more difficult from first round to last. Imagine taking out the magazine spring and cutting it in half. Spring preload will be reduced and the spring will deliver less resistance from first round to last compared to the original spring. Same thing with a shortened recoil spring.

It's silly to fret about slide to frame battering with a gun that the owner says he's going to shoot very little anyway. Dicking with a spring to accommodate user assembly is misguided.
Mostly no, no and more no.

A spring is a spring. Cutting a spring increases the force needed to compress the spring. While ‘preload’ length will be shorter the cut spring now has a higher spring ‘rate.

Cut a magazine spring in half and it will be much more difficult to get the last few rounds in.
 

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Mostly no, no and more no.

A spring is a spring. Cutting a spring increases the force needed to compress the spring. While ‘preload’ length will be shorter the cut spring now has a higher spring ‘rate.

Cut a magazine spring in half and it will be much more difficult to get the last few rounds in.
LOL!

The other day I joking referred to the Micro 9 forum becoming Soloesque. Gentlemen, I offer the highlighted as evidence.
 

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I encourage anyone doubting reality to learn by doing.

Get one of your Kimber 1911 full size 8rd mags and remove the spring. Put your index and middle finger on the middle coil and thumb on the follower end of the spring. Squeeze the half spring till it gets about 3/4 of an inch (full loaded mag compressed spring length) and you'll see how little force is required. Now try to compress the entire spring to 3/4in and see how much more force is required. Probably need to put a big long screwdriver or equivelant through the middle of the spring to keep it from bending. Or... just cut a mag spring in half, put the mag back together and give it a whirl.

Report back with your homework lesson.
 

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Ah, the science of springs. So often misunderstood by high school kids who cut coils off their Honda springs to lower them and then wonder why their heads are bouncing off the ceiling.

Springs are rated in pounds per inch, that is, how much weight is required to compress a certain spring of a certain length exactly one inch. It’s a function of both coil characteristic and spring length. If a spring is 10 inches long, and you stand it vertically and place a 10-pound weight on the end, and it compresses one inch, then that spring is a 10 pound per inch spring. But what is actually happening when the spring compresses? Each of the ten coils is compressing 1/10 of an inch.

Now, cut that spring in half. Place the same ten pound weight on the end. What happens? Each of the remaining five coils will still compress only 1/10 of an inch because their nature has not been changed. So, the spring will compress only half an inch. If you add another ten pounds the coils will each compress another 1/10 inch. That means that the spring rate of the shortened spring is now 20 pounds per inch.

Cutting any spring in half doubles its rate (assuming it’s a straight-rate spring and not progressively wound, which gun springs never are).

if you cut a magazine spring in half, such that it is shorter than the height of the magazine, it will have zero effect in the first few rounds because it is not being compressed. But once you introduce enough rounds for the spring to start compressing, it will be more difficult to load the remaining rounds to fill it up.

Now, this doesn’t take into account metal fatigue etc which has a detrimental effect on spring rate. We all know that recoil springs don’t have an infinite life. They can and do lose some of their pizzazz, mostly because of cycling use as opposed to age. When that happens their rate reduces (and often their length shrinks in the process). But when discussing gun spring rates of new springs, unless the length is kept constant, you can’t directly compare one with the other.

So, if the Galloway spring has a higher spring rate number than a stock Kimber spring but also has a longer length, you can’t immediately conclude that it is stiffer. You have to do the math. I assume that it is stiffer, but it may not be as MUCH stiffer as you would expect if it is also longer.

I will let the math wizards who have access to both springs (I’m out on both counts) make that determination.
 

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I encourage anyone doubting reality to learn by doing.

Get one of your Kimber 1911 full size 8rd mags and remove the spring. Put your index and middle finger on the middle coil and thumb on the follower end of the spring. Squeeze the half spring till it gets about 3/4 of an inch (full loaded mag compressed spring length) and you'll see how little force is required. Now try to compress the entire spring to 3/4in and see how much more force is required. Probably need to put a big long screwdriver or equivelant through the middle of the spring to keep it from bending. Or... just cut a mag spring in half, put the mag back together and give it a whirl.

Report back with your homework lesson.
No need for homework. Post #43 was clear, concise and correct.
 

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So, if the Galloway spring has a higher spring rate number than a stock Kimber spring but also has a longer length, you can’t immediately conclude that it is stiffer. You have to do the math. I assume that it is stiffer, but it may not be as MUCH stiffer as you would expect if it is also longer.
You didn't take into account the coil rate. From what I can see, my Galloway spring is 5/8" longer than the stock spring, but it only has 1 more coil. Galloway total length 4.375", number of coils 23, Kimber stock total length 3.75", number of coils 22.

But I'm not sure that is how the spring manufacturers are arriving at the force of the springs they advertise. If I place my Kimber stock spring on a cleaning rod, stand it on a food scale, then (using a muzzle protector cone) compress the spring all the way down (far more than an inch) the food scale reads 12 lbs. If I only compressed the spring one inch it would be nowhere near 11lbs.

And the Galloway spring so compressed only tips the scale at 13 lbs.
 

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No need for homework. Post #43 was clear, concise and correct.
You're both as wrong as wrong can be. This place has definitely devolved into Soloesque.

Imagine having a fully loaded mag, Now remove half the spring. Fantasizing that the spring will now be exerting more force against the rounds/follower is truly fantasy land. Heck, keep removing more and more of the spring and it will have more and more force until it blows the follower through the magazine lips, eh? LOL!

Do your homework. You'll return a bit more informed.
 
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