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Mike, this all sounds pretty familiar, doesn't it?

I recommend you at least perform the plunk test before you send it back to Kimber. The chamber may need to be finish reamed and the quickest, easiest way to determine this to do the plunk test with whatever ammo you have on hand.

Honestly, I'd run those two at the range function tests as well just in case. That way Kimber can take care of all the problems in one trip rather than having to send it in again if you discover other problems down the road.
 

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The feed ramp is jacked up! I’m going to call Kimber tomorrow to see if they can polish it up. It looks shallow anyways, right?
Because the frame is aluminum I'd be very hesitant about polishing it or recutting it. Once you go through the thin anodized layer the soft aluminum will be exposed. Repeated bullet impact on the soft aluminum will eventually result in divots that will seriously affect feeding.

I've put steel frame ramp inserts in all my aluminum framed 1911s to avoid this possibility. I doubt Kimber would do so.

I suggest you run the two range function tests. If there are no feeding issues traceable to the frame ramp, I wouldn't touch it.
 

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It doesn’t feel smooth at all. All the tarnished areas are rough. I test loaded a magazine just now and a full mag fed fine. White box Winchester.
As long as ammo feeds, I wouldn't mess with the feed ramp. Everyone wants a mirror polished feed ramp and it's not a bad thing to have but in this instance you risk compromising feeding reliability by removing the roughness.

I would simply shoot the pistol as is. If I just couldn't live with the rough feed ramp regardless of the fact that the pistol was 100% reliable, I'd find a good 1911 'smith and ask him to fit a steel frame ramp insert.

Here's the frame ramp insert I use.

Here's a pic of what one looks like after it's installed.
 
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