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I agree with Steve 1000%.
 

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Striker yes, hammer no. Within practical limits of course. A little dab will do ya. An excess of lubrication does not work better than enough. It's a gun, not a cutting tool.

The biggest rookie mistake I have witnessed besides overdoing it is using oil where grease should be and vice versa. I attended Glock Armorer courses just for grins when I lived in GA and the instructors said the same thing. High temp grease stays put, oil doesn't.

The worst problem from too much lubricant is fouling the striker and the surrounding channel/guide. With any striker pistol... never put or let oil get in there.

I was taught to run 1911s and Sigs (metal) wet. Beretta's (92) damp. Wet doesn't mean dripping. Here are my rule(s) of thumb:

1. grease on the slides.
2. a light film of oil on pivot pins, springs, and various fire control surfaces that rub

Gun lube and cleaning products are snake oil. That $15 tiny 4 oz bottle or tube of the best lubricant ever, used by Navy Seals, approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Marine Corps colonels, and God himself is BS. Most of the time, it's repackaged turbine oil or transmission fluid. Or in some cases synthetic motor oil. The sellers buy this stuff in 55-gallon drums, pour it into little bottles, and charge you out the gazoo for it. It's all marketing. The non-toxic variety that is allegedly safe to handle and doesn't contain stinky petroleum or other cancer-causing solvents ... are mostly plant-based products that were developed for lubricating machinery in food processing. Vegetable or seed oils. For example, Froglube is coconut oil.

In conclusion, I sometimes tell a chatty know-it-all at the range to mind his own beeswax. I don't go there to make new friends or receive unsolicited advice. On occasion, I use different words you aren't supposed to say here. :)
 

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Most gun oils are just mineral oil.
Any thin synthetic oil that maintains viscosity at higher temps will work fine.

Be careful using grease. Grease attracts and traps dirt and grit.
 

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Mineral oil is a generic term. Most commonly, mineral oil is a distillate of petroleum. Its closest cousin chemically is petroleum jelly.

Synthetic oil starts with a refined oil product then it's chemically modified to make its molecules of consistent size for better performance before additives are included. That base petroleum material is blended with artificial chemical compounds not found in natural crude oil. When molecules are uniformly sized and weighted, that makes a better lube. Lower viscosities for small, fuel-efficient engines and precision machinery are possible with synthetics where they were not with conventional lubricants.

So what does all that mean? Buy this stuff and skip the snake oil at the LGS. One bottle should last the rest of your life. You'll notice it is lighter than regular motor oil. Thick does not mean better. The grease, which is similar but with solids added costs 10 bucks for a pound at your local auto parts store or Walmart. Also enough for a lifetime.

Turbine and transmission oils are made with a similar synthetic formula. The difference is it's designed for higher temperatures and the very tight tolerances in turbine bearings. Thus additional additives such as oxidation inhibitors, defoamants, and demulsifiers. When you see gun oil products that are blue or red in color, odds are it's likely turbine oil or it's cousin transmission oil.

Automotive care Rectangle Tire Automotive cleaning Service
Product Rectangle Paint Gas Tire


I am not an oil expert by any means. But I have stayed at a Holiday Inn Express a few times. I also used to design the process control systems that run these places.

Sky Vehicle Gas City Industry


I won't dive further into the chemistry but if anyone asks what KY Jelly is made of I will answer. I also suggest you not put that stuff on any gun. Or holster. If you know what I mean. :)
 

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Gun lube and cleaning products are snake oil. That $15 tiny 4 oz bottle or tube of the best lubricant ever, used by Navy Seals, approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Marine Corps colonels, and God himself is BS. Most of the time, it's repackaged turbine oil or transmission fluid. Or in some cases synthetic motor oil. The sellers buy this stuff in 55-gallon drums, pour it into little bottles, and charge you out the gazoo for it. It's all marketing. The non-toxic variety that is allegedly safe to handle and doesn't contain stinky petroleum or other cancer-causing solvents ... are mostly plant-based products that were developed for lubricating machinery in food processing. Vegetable or seed oils. For example, Froglube is coconut oil.
Bingo! (y)(y)(y)
 

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Brownells has some good videos. I mostly use Rem Oil for cleaning and Mobil One for lubrication.


I like how the older guy wasn't buying the young guy's insistence on gun oil. Politely.

Not so subtle point: Always choose a synthetic. Regular motor oil works but it is not ideal.

One thing the younger guy said which is pretty much BS... no corrosion inhibitors in motor oil. Not true. Except maybe in older style dinosaur oil that your Dad used in his '59 Impala.

On the subject of corrosion.... if there is a film of oil on your non-stainless gun parts they will not rust. The molecular structure of modern synthetics penetrates the pores in metals. Older style oils do not. They sit on the surface.

I bought a bunch of those same bottles with the needle on Amazon and fill them as needed. Works great. Slap a fancy label on them and sell for $15 bucks each!
 
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