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Discussion Starter #1
No matter if I shoot my solo cdp or my Springfield EMP I shoot low and to the left just inside and oust side the ring. At 7 o’clock. I have been shooting 9mm 124 grain American eagle. I have not been shooting long but have been taught about grip, sight pattern and trigger squeeze. I know I’m doing something wrong but can’t figure out what, any suggestions
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Guys this should help thanks again for the charts
 

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Gmontain, sbubrick, Thanks. That's what I was trying to post up.
 

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Being pre programmed as "clutches and gatherers", there is nothing about the mechanic of pressing a trigger that is natural to our movements. We need to re program how we move in order to let the gun go bang without disturbing the sights or the sight picture. There is a difference but that is different topic.

Your 7 o clocking group is classic for a righty that has some sympathetic grip while depressing the trigger or milking the grip. Try this.

Leaving the index finger straight, curl the lower three fingers keeping their side contact with one another till the very tip of the middle finger barely touches the tip of the depressed thumb. Hold them there and the. Lift and extend the thumb. This should about simulate the hold on the gun. Now keeping the long bone of the index finger straight (like parallel to the bore as it should be) work only the short bones of the index finger as is pressing the trigger.

Look through the "tube" you have made with your simulated grip. If the thumb or lower fingers move at all it effects the shot. Pressure on the support side of the guns rear will move the front sight to the left. Since these fingers are low on the frame the nose will dip too.

If the long bone of the trigger finger moves to the left while breaking the shot the muzzle will go left too. But since this finger is much higher on the gun close to bore, the shot will be more to 9 o clock.

Doing this will same lots of range time and ammo since we need to consciously reprogram so that and unnatural act becomes SUBconcious. Doing this slow till you can do without the evil movements. Work the trigger finger faster and see the movement return. Work this speed till movement is stopped. Etc etc. you will increase the speed that you can should while maintaining g acceptable accuracy as you improve.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Mike
Great info I will follow with this thanks for taken the time to explain
 

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This is a thread worth re-booting...for range firing...my experience:

Most of us right handed shooters began low and left...I say "right on track" and completely normal.
Safe dry firing is something I highly recommend. "So why is it when I dry fire I can keep the front site level and hit the imaginary bulls-eye??"
Answer: you are completely relaxed and know the weapon will not fire.
There's nothing natural about something exploding in our hands.

Point#1)
For me, until I realized the grip, front sight orientation, and trigger pull need to all work together my shooting was spotty at best. My first shot at the range was almost always on target as I was simply following the good practices used during dry fire. Once that first "explosion" happened I began tightening up hence hammering the trigger because now I needed to know when the gun was going to fire. Call it anxiety or whatever you want.

Point#2)
For me, until I realized that my support hand was actually used for support, I still had problems. What works for me is 60-70% of the energy to grip the weapon for recoil comes from my support hand allowing my trigger hand to be relaxed. Under these conditions, you can really concentrate on that smooth, slow trigger pull without jerking the gun downward when firing. Does it take practice? Hell yes. You really do not want to know when the gun will fire under these conditions; you must convince yourself "why should I care when the gun fires, my support hand is in control".

Last Point):D
For me, once the above mentioned points were in place, I could really concentrate on the front sight orientation making that the most important part of my shooting. At that point I could stay completely focused on keeping the sights on target until the weapon magically fired. The thought process at that point is truely keeping the sights on target for as long as you can controlling "wobble" until BANG!
 

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This is a thread worth re-booting...for range firing...my experience:

Most of us right handed shooters began low and left...I say "right on track" and completely normal.
Safe dry firing is something I highly recommend. "So why is it when I dry fire I can keep the front site level and hit the imaginary bulls-eye??"
Answer: you are completely relaxed and know the weapon will not fire.
There's nothing natural about something exploding in our hands.

Point#1)
For me, until I realized the grip, front sight orientation, and trigger pull need to all work together my shooting was spotty at best. My first shot at the range was almost always on target as I was simply following the good practices used during dry fire. Once that first "explosion" happened I began tightening up hence hammering the trigger because now I needed to know when the gun was going to fire. Call it anxiety or whatever you want.

Point#2)
For me, until I realized that my support hand was actually used for support, I still had problems. What works for me is 60-70% of the energy to grip the weapon for recoil comes from my support hand allowing my trigger hand to be relaxed. Under these conditions, you can really concentrate on that smooth, slow trigger pull without jerking the gun downward when firing. Does it take practice? Hell yes. You really do not want to know when the gun will fire under these conditions; you must convince yourself "why should I care when the gun fires, my support hand is in control".

Last Point):D
For me, once the above mentioned points were in place, I could really concentrate on the front sight orientation making that the most important part of my shooting. At that point I could stay completely focused on keeping the sights on target until the weapon magically fired. The thought process at that point is truely keeping the sights on target for as long as you can controlling "wobble" until BANG!
Well stated. Practice and more practice. Induction from a qualified instructor helps as well. Even golf pros have swing coaches!
 
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