Kimber Talk Forums banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Other than the ammo provided at work for duty and mandatory training, I have not purchased center fire handgun ammo in many years. Depending on schedule I usually reload about 12-15k 45 and 9 rounds per year. More for 5.56 rifles.

How many here are re loaders and what are your recipes?
There was no where else I saw that subject fit in my opinion but the mods can move or delete if they wish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,761 Posts
Hi Mike right now for 45acp I'm using zero 230gr. fmj with 6gr. Unique powder with Federal primers. to load about 10k a year.
Factoring in the cost of the press and supplies, what do you guess is the cost per round? I used to reload but got out of it many years ago. I found it to be an enjoyable way to pass the time. I can buy 500 rds (reloads) of 230gr .45 for $205.00. That's about $0.41 per round. I'd consider buying a press, etc. if the resulting savings per round added up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,761 Posts
I hear ya on the 'personal time.'

Probably the most fun you can have alone, in the house, without alcohol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,761 Posts
OK, I decided to use the interwebs to get some numbers and try to figure out a break-even point for number of rounds. I'm sure I have left of some minor accessories but this is probably close. If not, let me know.

Rectangle Font Parallel Number Screenshot
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
41,305 Posts
OK, I decided to use the interwebs to get some numbers and try to figure out a break-even point for number of rounds. I'm sure I have left of some minor accessories but this is probably close. If not, let me know.

View attachment 313
You're missing a couple of hundred dollars worth of equipment. A case cleaner, a good scale, storage bins, case lube, misc brushes etc. Unless you're reloading for a bunch of guys you don't need a press that can knock out 800 rounds an hour. Save a couple of hundred dollars and go with a Square Deal "B" @ 400 rounds an hour or a RL 550B @ 500 rounds an hour. I used to reload back in the day and still have all my RCBS stuff, unfortunately all I could afford back then was a single stage press.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A couple years ago a friend wanted to start reloading and we figured at 6k rounds of 9mm he would break even on equipment (Dillon Square Deal and misc necessities). So in six months he was even.

My 45 load is 16 cents a shot. Until my supplies of components run out and the newer prices of things will hit me. But it's still about 40% of WWB.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,237 Posts
A couple years ago a friend wanted to start reloading and we figured at 6k rounds of 9mm he would break even on equipment (Dillon Square Deal and misc necessities). So in six months he was even.

My 45 load is 16 cents a shot. Until my supplies of components run out and the newer prices of things will hit me. But it's still about 40% of WWB.
Mike, since you're an experienced re-loader. What do you recommend for a beginner getting started?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Mike, since you're an experienced re-loader. What do you recommend for a beginner getting started?
You need to consider your needs and predict future needs. Are you only going to load one handgun caliber or several? Handgun and rifle? And is money more important than your time? How many rounds of center fire ammo do you shoot a year?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,237 Posts
You need to consider your needs and predict future needs. Are you only going to load one handgun caliber or several? Handgun and rifle? And is money more important than your time? How many rounds of center fire ammo do you shoot a year?
Probably all good questions for someone thinking about getting into re-loading to consider. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,761 Posts
yeah, that's the kind of info a guy needs in order to get permission, ... er, um, well ... you know what I mean.

I chose the XL650 because I've heard it is kind of the top of the line, so I didn't want to skimp on my estimations. I figured I'd miss a few things, but basically, after about 3,000 rounds you actually start to reap the benefits of the savings. But the therapy received from day one is probably immeasurable.

If I spend $1,000 on reloading equipment that means the desired Pro model is out. I hate choices.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
41,305 Posts
An investment in reloading equipment is a life long investment. It's not like you buy a setup for a particular gun and when the gun is sold you have to start all over. I probably have dies and shell holders for 13 different calibers. Reloading also opens up another door for shooters the world of wildcats. I have guns that are totally useless to anyone but reloaders. You can not buy ammo for them, you have to start with a piece of brass and form it to fit the gun. My .357 Herrett is a good example, it uses a shortened 30-30 case that is then expanded to .35 cal. Dillon equipment is top of the line but why pay big bucks for a machine that will spit out a years worth of ammo in a two hours when you can buy a less expensive machine, save money and take 4 hours to do it? If you have a close group of guys that like to shoot you can each throw in some money and share the press. I started reloading that way, we each bought our own brass, primers, powder and bullets but shared the expense of the equipment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,222 Posts
An investment in reloading equipment is a life long investment. It's not like you buy a setup for a particular gun and when the gun is sold you have to start all over. I probably have dies and shell holders for 13 different calibers. Reloading also opens up another door for shooters the world of wildcats. I have guns that are totally useless to anyone but reloaders. You can not buy ammo for them, you have to start with a piece of brass and form it to fit the gun. My .357 Herrett is a good example, it uses a shortened 30-30 case that is then expanded to .35 cal. Dillon equipment is top of the line but why pay big bucks for a machine that will spit out a years worth of ammo in a two hours when you can buy a less expensive machine, save money and take 4 hours to do it? If you have a close group of guys that like to shoot you can each throw in some money and share the press. I started reloading that way, we each bought our own brass, primers, powder and bullets but shared the expense of the equipment.
Way above my pay grade Chuck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,757 Posts
Old reloader and some recipes!

Back when I was heavily into competition shooting, I reloaded. I had a Lyman press, RCBS casting equipment, RCBS sizer/luber, Lyman powder measure, Lyman scale and Lee priming tool. I had to buy primes and powder. I got all the lead that I could ever need at work--free! If I wrote off my time to do the loading, it cost me about .04 a round to load .38's and .05 a round for .44's or .45's. I reloaded for years. Heck, when they got a bit older, I put my kids to work doing it, also (they were supervised and taught to have a good healthy respect for what they were doing--I demonstrated the power of gun powder and primers to them).

I just gave up on it last year. I sold all my equipment and bought a bunch of ammo with the money. If I was to get back into it, I would definitely get a Dillion Progressive loading press. It doesn't cost much more than a single stage or turret press and as Chuck43 says, it will load a bunch of rounds in an hour. While I always enjoyed the peace and quiet of my reloading room, I'd rather spend my time shooting!!! :D:D:D

As for loads, I made:

- .38 Spl target loads used a 150 grain Keith type hard cast lead semi-wadcutter over 2.8 grains of Bullseye powder. General purpose .38's with the same bullet over 5 grains of Unique (a stout load, but accurate as hell). All of these with small standard pistol primer, usually CCI.
-.357 magnums, I used the same Keith type bullet over 15 grains of 2400 powder with a CCI magnum small pistol primer.
-.44 Spl's were loaded with a 250 grain Keith type hard cast lead semi-wadcutter over 7.5 grains of Unique powder and a CCI large standard pistol primer.
-.45 Colt's were loaded with 250 grain Keith type hard cast lead semi-wadcutters over 8.5 grains of Unique and a CCI large standard pistol primer.
-.45 ACP target loads were loaded with a 235 grain hard cast lead semi-wadcutter, over 3.5 grains of Bulleye and a CCI large standard pistol primer. General purpose .45 ACP loads with the same bullet and 5.5 grains of Unique powder and a standard CCI large primer.
-.44 Magnums were loaded with the 250 grain hard cast Keith type bullet over 22 grains of 2400 powder and a CCI large magnum pistol primer.

You may substitute jacketed bullets of the same weight range in any of the magnum loads, but that's gonna cost extra!!

There you have my recipes. You may add salt to taste!!! ;););)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
I did reload some 44 mag. last fall I used Hornady 240 gr. XTP 20.2 gr. of Lil-Gun powder and Federal primers. I used them to cut down a tree at my camp last year. a 12 in. white pine worked great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
One other thing is that brass is reusable and all I have has been free that I picked up at the range where I shoot. The Dillon 550B is what I have used for years and is all you need unless you are a pro shooter. The last bullets I bought I paid $120. for a 1000. My favorite load is 4.7 W231 with the Berry's 230gn bullet.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top