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I have a new Kimber custom ll the slide release is almost impossible to release. I have to shift the gun to to other hand and use quit a bit of pressure to get it to release. I have compared it to my 2 other 191's (colt & Para) and they are smooth and easy.
I have not take this gun to the range yet.
Thank you
 

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"Slingshot" the slide to load the first round.

Welcome to the site from Tennessee.
 

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As the others have said "sling shot" it, what you're calling "the slide release" is really called the "slide stop".

Welcome to the forum hdrider98ci, how about stopping by our "New Member Introduction" sub forum and introducing yourself to the membership. Tell us something about yourself, your hobbies, and what area you're located in.
 

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Welcome @hdrider98ci ... you heard it right. It's a slide stop not a release...though it may release the eventually when the firearm wears in after a few hundred round. I have a Shield Plus that the slide would not release that way either. It's slowly wearing in with use.
 

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I have a new Kimber custom ll the slide release is almost impossible to release. I have to shift the gun to to other hand and use quit a bit of pressure to get it to release. I have compared it to my 2 other 191's (colt & Para) and they are smooth and easy.
I have not take this gun to the range yet.
Thank you
Are you trying to release it with a loaded mag or empty mag in the gun? Shouldn’t be a problem on a loaded mag, and as others have suggested the slingshot method is what most people use. If you’re trying to release it on an empty mag, the magazine follower is holding it up, which is what it’s supposed to do. That is what locks the slide back on the last round.
 

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While the slingshot is the preferred method for reloading . . .
It's really a personal preference thing. It seems most folks who learn to shoot using Glocks or other striker fired pistols gravitate to the slingshot method which may have something to do with how small the slide stop is on these pistols. By contrast, most folks brought up with the 1911 prefer the slide stop method. Whichever method works best for you is what you should use.

There is little debate about which one is faster but faster is irrelevant if its not also 100% reliable.

I have participated in informal range sessions testing this specific question and there are lots of You Tube videos on the subject as well.
 

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...military trained Army's small arms and was taught to sling shot load the first round of the magazine...

...and as you will read in some 1911 forums other than here: "...sling shot load... It allows the slide a free and clear run home to chamber a round using the maximum slide movement distance and recoil spring force. Less chance of a jam. Besides, it's a slide stop (1911), not a slide release."
 

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Both.

On a one way range with a M9 your slide was usually locked back as you walked onto the range. Rolling outside of the wire the slide was typically forward, you could lock it back but none of our magazines were empty at that point

To clarify my previous post the slingshot is my preferred method. Now, sometimes it was just easier to just thumb the slide stop. To make that as easy as possible when I need it to work most of my pistols do get enlarged slide stop levers if the OEM ones are too small. As you mentioned the Glock one is pretty small, that is one of the first things I do to my Glocks.
 

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During my time ('70s and '80s) our issue sidearms were Colt 1911s which were referred too simply as forty-fives since it was the most common .45 caliber handgun in existence. Of course, they were WWI and WWII vintage. I heard horror stories about the M9.

The Army's small arm training has changed over the years. Like you, I was trained to load on a closed slide by racking the slide. Unlike you, I was trained to depress the slide stop to get back into the fight after a reload.

Copied from FM 23-25:

Page 11

• 12. METHOD OF OPERATION.—a. A loaded magazine is placed in the receiver and the slide drawn fully back and released, thus bringing the first cartridge into the chamber. (If the slide is open push down the slide stop to let the slide go for ward.) The hammer is thus cocked and the pistol is ready for firing.

Page 14

h. To release the slide from the open position, it is only necessary to press upon the thumbpiece of the slide stop, then the slide will go forward to its closed position, carrying a cartridge from the previously inserted magazine into the barrel and making the pistol ready for firing again.

Who is that handsome devil with the poor trigger discipline?

Annual forty-five qualification at Graf.
 

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Jesus Alphabet! How do you say that Sir?!?

You are correct, different manual of arms. The M9 wasn’t bad really, a lot of the early problems seem to have been ammunition related. The beat down and worn out ones would disassemble themselves if you shook them a certain way. A newer one would be good to go though.

I was taught to do both by my NCO’s back when I was just a dumb private. It stuck and was there when it was needed. Made sure that my joes had it ingrained both ways.

Anyways, here’s what the M9 book said about it.

Font Parallel Paper Illustration Paper product
Font Publication Paper Paper product Parallel
 
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