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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was one of the other stores thats in the chain but not the busiest....I had just left the range with a close friend from work who I'd know for 40 years and he had never shot a gun.When he found out what ammo cost he didn't want to shoot anymore...I said David don't worry about it...I need to break these guns in and just shoot...we couldn't always see any results on the targets but I needed him to just shoot...he found out quick it ain't that easy to get acceptable results. I guess I should have started out at 7 yds n not 15...this store had 9's for 16.99 and was able to get 4 boxes of 50 for $72 something.In talking to the sales person about the fact I'd just bought a Kimber at the other location and it wasn't that accurate yet..he told me it would take a thousand rounds before it would be good because they were built so tight...people don't realize buying a pistol is just half the equation...it takes a sizable investment to get these guns shooting good...
 

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Your right it is a expensive sport if that's how your looking at it. but as training for yourself and teaching for another its priceless..
 

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Yeah, the 'hidden' costs of the shooting sports is substantial, but at least it's not as bad as boating. (been there, done that)

No, it will not take 1,000 round for your Kimber to shoot well. I have 800 through mine and it's been out-shooting me for a long time now, without a hiccup.
 
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Your right it is a expensive sport if that's how your looking at it. but as training for yourself and teaching for another its priceless..
It is a pricey habit I agree. One of the reasons I sold my Desert Eagle .50 Caliber was the fact that every time I pulled the trigger it cost as much as a Subway sandwich:D But everyone needs outlets and ways to vent and I choose to go "bang bang" at pieces of paper or metal circles. It does take a great many rounds and a sizeable amount of $$ to properly break in a quality firearm, but the journey is a blast. ( pun intended)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
does anyone have a general idea when Kimbers begin to group better....I've seen results start to happen on some other pistols after 250 rds. My S/A 1911 was ridiculous at first...and still has a way to go...
 

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Kimber recommends a 500 round break in period. My PCII ran good right out of the box, so I guess it varies some. Keep shooting it, and it'll keep getting better.
 

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All of my Kimbers grouped very good right out of the box and haven't gotten any better with break in. I have a post in the 1911 page for a range report of my new pro carry II. I reload so it cost me about $.15 a round to shoot I don't think I could afford it otherwise.
 

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The 500 round recommendation is to ensure proper function and mating of the surfaces. It really has little to do with the shot group. Yes, one could argue the mating of the surfaces is part of the grouping equation, but really, ever pick up a government model? They rattle like loose parts in a can but can fire a group of 2 inches, or so, at 25 yards all day long, from a machine rest.
Grouping is far more a matter of the mechanics of shooting the same way, every time. Same grip on the weapon. Same sight picture. same trigger squeeze. If one can put those three factors in a bag and replicate them every time, the groups will clearly demonstrate that fact.
 
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Right out of the box, my Pro Carry II put six rounds in the middle of the center ring and one at 7:00 about 6 inches off center. I shot 100 rounds today which puts me at 1900 rounds down range and the results were about the same. I see no difference in how the gun shoots between now and that first mag. The gun shoots great and I have good days and bad days. When I have tried different stances and grips, I get different results, but I don't think the gun gets better or worse. It is the one constant in my opinion. I suppose you'd have to shoot from a vice to know what the gun is doing without your influence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was afraid of that........shot good on tues...wed.was down hill all the way. I had started using a rest on new guns but found it wasn't as much fun. Prefer the 15 yd. and taking my chances off hand.
 

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Oh Yeah........!!!!

My new Pro carry II .45 ACP, after the first shot, left a beautiful, well centered, one ragged hole grouping in the target that was less than a half inch in diameter!! I consider that phenomenal accuracy for a pistol right out of the box!! :eek::eek::eek:;)

Love my Kimber!!!:D:D
Kimber Pro Carry II.JPG
 
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With a new gun or type of gun, I usually start at 5 yards, then 7 yards, then 10 yards. This gives me time to develop a feel for the gun and gain some muscle memory. I'm not a great shooter, but I figure if I can hold a reasonable group at 7 or 10 yards, I've got self defense accuracy down. Anything beyond 10 yards is just plinking fun to see what happens. I'd love to be one of those guys that shoots 2" groups at 25 yards. I can't see 2" at 25 yards. :D
 

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One of the first targets I shot...if this wasn't the first, it looks just like it. 7 or 8 yards. This range isn't well marked on distance. But the group in the center is maybe 2 inches...if the spine lines are 3 or 4 inches. Obviously, there is the one stray as a result of anticipating recoil and jerking. I didn't know squat about shooting, so I'd say the gun was pretty accurate out of the box.

I pretty much stay at 7 yards because at longer distances I just totally suck and I prefer my illusions in tact.
 

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With a new gun or type of gun, I usually start at 5 yards, then 7 yards, then 10 yards. This gives me time to develop a feel for the gun and gain some muscle memory. I'm not a great shooter, but I figure if I can hold a reasonable group at 7 or 10 yards, I've got self defense accuracy down. Anything beyond 10 yards is just plinking fun to see what happens. I'd love to be one of those guys that shoots 2" groups at 25 yards. I can't see 2" at 25 yards. :D
At 25 yards I'd be happy with a two-FOOT group. :eek:
 
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